Skip to main content

tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  November 27, 2019 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

2:00 pm
hello, you're watching afternoon live, i'm carrie gracie. today at 3: the snp launches its election manifesto, warning that the uk may still leave the european union without a deal with hello, you're watching brexit—related chaos to come. afternoon live, i'm carrie gracie. today at 2: the snp launches its election manifesto, warning that the uk may who should decide scotland's future? still leave europe without a deal the people who live and that there's here or boris johnson? a vote for the snp on december 12th brexit—related chaos to come. who should decide scotland's future? is a vote to escape brexit. the people who live the labour leader highlights here or boris johnson? documents which he claims show a vote for the snp on december 12th the government has discussed offering the united states access to the nhs after brexit. is a vote to escape brexit. these documents confirm the us the labour leader produces documents is demanding the nhs which he claims shows the government is on the table in the trade talks. has discussed offering the united states access these uncensored documents leave to the nhs after brexit. borisjohnson's denials in absolute tatters. these documents confirm the us is demanding the nhs it's total nonsense. is on the table in the trade talks. and this is brought up time and again by the labour party these uncensored documents leave as a distraction from the problems
2:01 pm
borisjohnson‘s denials in absolute tatters. that they're having. after a cinema chain bans a film it's total nonsense. about gangs after brawls broke out, and this is brought up time its director tells us his movie had and again by the labour party nothing to do with the violence. as a distraction from the problems is it prejudiced? that they are having. do they believe this film after a cinema chain bans a new film brings a certain type? is it a colour thing? about gangs after brawls broke out, you start thinking all these things, you know, and then, i don't know, its director tells us his movie had it was an upsetting time. nothing to do with the violence. coming up on afternoon live: is it prejudiced? all the sport with katie shanahan. do they believe this film brings a certain type? we'll bring you the remarkable story is it a colour thing? of max taylor who, at 19 years old, could step out for manchester united you start thinking all these things, you know, and then, i don't know, against astana tomorrow in the europa league after recovering it was an upsetting time. coming up on afternoon live: from testicular cancer. all the sport with katie shanahan. thanks, katie. we'll bring you the remarkable and ben rich has all the weather. story of max taylor who, at 19 years old, could step out for manchester united against astana tomorrow we have got rain to content with but in the europa league after recovering from it should brighten up just in time testicular cancer. for the weekend. on the other side thanks, katie. of the pond, very heavy snow has
2:02 pm
and ben rich has all the weather. arrived just in time for thanksgiving. full low down just before half past. some of us have got brightness thanks, ben. today. there is also quite a lot of also coming up: gary rhodes, rain. brightness will increasingly the celebrity chef who championed british food, has died be the story. full uk details plus significant snow on the other side at the age of 59. of the pond all coming up. thanks, ben. also coming up: gary rhodes, the celebrity chef who championed british food, has died at the age of 59. hello, everyone, this is afternoon live. the scottish national party has launched its manifesto for next month's general election, saying it is time for scotland to be treated fairly. the party leader, nicola sturgeon, said the country will pay a price for what she called the conservatives' obsession with brexit. she said another independence hello, everyone, this is afternoon live. referendum next year would be the main demand for supporting the scottish national party has launched its manifesto for next a possible minority labour month's general election, saying it is time for scotland government alongside calls
2:03 pm
to be treated fairly. for increased spending on the nhs. the party leader, nicola sturgeon, 0ur scotland correspondent, said the country will pay a price for what she called the conservatives‘ james shaw, reports. obsession with brexit. she said another independence for many, this is referendum next year would be the brexit election. the main demand for supporting for nicola sturgeon and the snp, it is also a possible minority labour the independence election. government alongside calls because her price for supporting for increased spending on the nhs. a minority labour government our scotland correspondent, would be the right to hold a second independence referendum. james shaw, reports. first, there was a warning about what she thinks a conservative government for many, this is the brexit election. for nicola sturgeon would actually mean. and the snp, it is also unless borisjohnson is stopped, this willjust be the start. the independence election. brexit is nowhere near being done. the tories have barely got going. because her price for supporting a minority labour government they haven't even started would be the right to hold a second independence referendum. trade talks yet and, first, there was a warning about what she thinks because of johnson's ha rdline a conservative government position, there is every chance, would actually mean. unless borisjohnson is stopped, every chance, that the uk will leave this willjust be the start. the eu without a trade deal next year. brexit is nowhere near being done. that would be a catastrophe forjobs.
2:04 pm
the tories have barely got going. and even if he somehow avoids that, his a dream deal will be they haven't even started a nightmare for scotland. trade talks yet and, and nicola sturgeon had because of johnson's ha rdline position, there is every a big promise on the nhs, chance, every chance, that the uk will leave the eu another part of that price without a trade deal next year. for supporting labour. that would be if the next uk government raised health spending per head a catastrophe forjobs. to the current scottish level, it would not only substantially and even if he somehow avoids that, increase health investment his a dream deal will be in england, it would mean a nightmare for scotland. by 2024—25, frontline investment and nicola sturgeon had in nhs scotland would be £4 billion a big promise on the nhs, another part of that price higher than it is today. for supporting labour. if the next uk government raised health spending per head other priorities include to the current scottish level, £1.5 billion to end austerity, it would not only substantially decisive moves to halt climate increase health investment change, opposition to increasing the pension age and scrapping in england, it would mean trident nuclear submarines by 2024—25, frontline investment based in scotland. in nhs scotland would be £4 billion higher than it is today. but what about another independence referendum? other priorities include people are becoming increasingly £1.5 billion to end austerity, sick of hearing jeremy corbyn decisive moves to halt climate and borisjohnson talking about not
2:05 pm
change, opposition to increasing allowing the scottish people the pension age and scrapping to choose their own future. trident nuclear submarines based in scotland. well, i've got news for them. it is not up to you. but what about another applause. independence referendum? people are becoming increasingly sick of hearing jeremy corbyn and borisjohnson talking about not allowing the scottish people to choose their own future. and you know what? well, i've got news for them. it is not up to me either. it is not up to you. it is a decision for applause the people of scotland. in scotland, it is hard to separate this election from the independence question. if borisjohnson wins and brexit happens, does that mean scottish voters will be more likely and you know what? to want to break away it is not up to me either. from the united kingdom? the answer to that question affects the future of scotland and the rest of the uk. it is a decision for the people of scotland. in scotland, it is hard to separate their selection and we can speak to james now. from the independence question. if borisjohnson wins and brexit happens, does that mean scottish voters will be more likely to want to break away she seems to be making brexit the from the united kingdom?
2:06 pm
the answer to that question affects co re she seems to be making brexit the the future of scotland core of her campaign message. the and the rest of the uk. difference though in scotland, of course brexit is at the centre of the campaign, but the difference in jeremy corbyn says he has evidence scotla nd the campaign, but the difference in that the nhs is at risk scotland is that intertwined with from a post—brexit trade deal thatis scotland is that intertwined with that is the question of independence with the united states. as well and in scotland you cannot at a news conference this morning, ta ke as well and in scotland you cannot take them apart because the question the labour leader produced documents of whether or not brexit happens which he said showed talks had taken place about drugs pricing also has a profound bearing on and access to nhs contracts. whether or not people in scotland borisjohnson dismissed the claims might want to stay in the united as total nonsense and said kingdom or might think there is he could give an absolute cast iron potentially a different future for guarantee the nhs would not be them leaving the uk and for some on the table in trade talks. our political correspondent, people rejoining the european union. jessica parker, reports. do you think there is a sense to which the electoral map in scotland a51 pages of unredacted is driving some of the things we heard today, the need to peel off documents and information. voters from the side with outside? all of it here. the snp did pretty well in the brandishing these, it was intended election last time in scotland in to be a dramatic moment. he claims these documents, detailing meetings between us and uk 2017, 35 mp5 they election last time in scotland in 2017, 35 mps they won, and they
2:07 pm
officials, prove the nhs is at risk would hope to gain more this time from a conservative led brexit. around. they will feel that the last more expensive drug prices, he says, time around was a low point for them and in terms of how the public views runaway privatisation. on issues like brexit, the fact that the majority of people in scotland now we know, direct from the secret reports, that they never wanted you to see. are against it and the snp have the us is demanding that our nhs is on the table pitched themselves in scotland as in negotiations for a toxic deal. the remain party, they will believe it is no secret that american that there is a dividend to be companies want access to the uk drugs market but, reaped from that position they are in these piles and piles taking. down the line, talking about of documents, do you have evidence that uk ministers agreed borisjohnson being that the health service should be part of trade talks? taking. down the line, talking about boris johnson being unfit for if you want to know office, that strong language, devil whether ministers were involved in the deep blue sea type language, in these talks or not, it would make it difficult for her then they sanctioned the talks, they are obviously fully aware to thereafter negotiate an independence referendum. that is a of the talks, and they are the ones that were declining to make good question. i think probably a the documents published. if, say, borisjohnson is the next lot of the snp calculation centres prime minister and he wants to secure a trade deal with the us, around the possibility at least that he is going to have to concede
2:08 pm
ground on a number of issues. labour might be in a position to i'm certain that the nhs form a minority government and will be one of them. so there is a big wad of paper jeremy corbyn has made it clear that to wade through and interpret and labour will make its claims they have not closed off the idea of in terms of what these meetings, which we have heard having a second independence of before, really amount to. referendum. it would not be a but of those claims will be heavily contested. priority for them, it will not happen the first few years if there borisjohnson, visiting a hospital today, wasn't prime minister was a minority labour government, when these meetings took but he has not closed off the idea, place and said... so the fact that the snp said they there will be no sale of the nhs, no privatisation. would not do anything to help the the nhs is not on the table in any way. conservatives get into downing street but they would be willing to the nhs is in no way on the table, reach some sort of agreement with in no aspect whatever. labour and jeremy corbyn, that tells and this, as i say, is continually you that they have committed in brought up by the labour party as a diversionary tactic from the difficulties terms of any postal action arrangement to talking to labour but they are encountering. today's effort and a big not talking to the conservatives. moment for labour came after a series of difficult ones i'm joined now by chris morris, forjeremy corbyn yesterday. are you fit for high office? the bbc‘s reality check heavily criticised over his handling correspondent, who's been taking of anti—semitism allegations, a look at some of the detail. he was asked again if he wanted chris, what have you picked out? to apologise to
2:09 pm
the jewish community. i made it very clear — anti—semitism is completely first cost of brexit. we are back wrong in our society. into the realm of economic our party did make it clear forecasts, which are just that. but when i was elected leader and after that that anti—semitism the snp is using a scottish is unacceptable in any form government assessment first released in 2018 which is by the end of the in our party or our society and, indeed, offered its sympathies next decade, leaving the single and apologies to those market in the customs union could that had suffered. cut scotland's national income by £9 while his shadow billion which they say is equivalent chancellor said this. to £1600 for every person in we have a said that scotland. now, it is true that the and i will repeat it again, i am really sorry the way we handled vast majority of forecasts say that the economy will be small as a the issue because we learned the lessons from that and we have result of brexit, but national also invited people to say if there are still more income is not the same as household lessons to be learned, come and see us and help us. wealth, household income or gdp talking about the nhs today, that is more comfortable territory forjeremy corbyn. includes company profit. so politicians may find suggesting it would be a guaranteed a path onto other topics but it isn't always easy. cost of £1600 per person in scotland the leader of plaid cymru, is not actually that reliable. to be adam price, has insisted fairto miss that his demand for a future is not actually that reliable. to be fair to miss sturgeon, she has toned referendum about welsh down her language from early in the
2:10 pm
independence is realistic. the party, which is defending four campaign when she said explicitly seats at the election, that brexit will cost every person wants a referendum by 2030. mr price said support £1600. maybe she read our beautiful for a breakaway is growing. online reality check but we would not argue with the overall point if you look at younger people, that it not argue with the overall point thatitis not argue with the overall point that it is likely that the people in 54% now support independence. scotla nd that it is likely that the people in scotland will be poorer if they leave the single market and customs it's theirfuture, you know, union. we have not yet talked about that we are talking about and i think there is a realisation, trident because she wants trident look at the chaos of westminster out of scotland. what did she have in the last three and a half years. to say about that in the manifesto? many, many people are coming to the conclusion there a long—standing policy not to has to be a better way, a welsh way of solving our problems. replace trident. the replacement would be based on the clyde in the celebrity chef gary rhodes has died at the age of 59. scotland. the snp says the cost of he presented bbc series including replacing trident would be a masterchef and rhodes around britain whopping £205 billion over the next and in his restaurants was awarded 30 years based on official figures. a record five michelin stars. the mod has a series of figures, 31 tributes have been paid by many of the country's best—known chefs. billion for new submarines, another gordon ramsay said that gary rhodes put british cuisine on the map 41 billion for new warheads, but the and marcus wareing said he will be tricky bit is calculating the annual remembered as a great british icon. in—service cost. the snp seem to be our entertainment correspondent,
2:11 pm
lizo mzimba, looks back at his career. relying on this figure that over the when it came to kitchen cuisine, next 30 years it would be £142 gary rhodes‘ flair for food made him a rock star chef, billion. we have looked at those perhaps the first to figures and we think it would be lower than that. if you take the really make cooking cool. next 30 years, we think it would be you have got flavour, you have got taste. 40 billion less than that. this pretty good question to ask, figure we think refers to further in the kitchen is so hot here... the future leading up to 2065. the it was more than 30 years ago that overall point is that whatever you keith floyd filmed a young head chef are talking about is a lot of money but what you should not do is imply at the michelin—starred somehow that if you did scrap castle hotel in taunton. trident all of this money would rhodes still in his mid—20s. suddenly be available straightaway his firstjob was in amsterdam, to spend on public services because but his kitchen career, working in a hotel, these are essentially educated was almost derailed. running for a tram, economic guesses stretching decades he was hit by a van. into the future. and the other big his head injury destroyed his senses of taste and smell, one, the independence referendum, a crucial tools for a chef. very ironclad and a constant refrain from nicola sturgeon. you talked about it with james but one thing the manifesto makes clear is that the manifesto makes clear is that the doctor said, you haven't done the snp believes that the next very well, and i said, what does this mean? scottish referendum should take
2:12 pm
he said it means you place next year in 2020, the need a new career. and, for me, that was devastating. intended year of the independence he did recover and, starting referendum. it says implied, this with hot chefs, landed a succession of high—profile cooking jobs. would be the basis on which she we are on the great british revival. if you are worried about egg whites, would be the basis on which she would negotiate withjeremy corbyn if she were to be in a position to make some meringues. offer case—by—case support for a he was one of those chefs i always minority led government. the wanted to watch work. i don't normally sit there and watch other chefs doing conservatives say, though it corbin, demonstrations but, with gary, get the snp as well, two referendums it was always something new. next year, but we should remember his approachable personality meant whatjeremy corbyn himself has said, he was also in prime—time demand from the holiday programme. he said in the early years of a i am a chef and they have sent me labour government they would not touring but you won't catch support a referendum and when pressed he said certainly not in the me doing any cooking. i am here to find out... to strictly. first two years. if it got into contemporaries have haggling after an election and we we re haggling after an election and we been paying tribute. were ina haggling after an election and we were in a hung parliament, that gordon ramsay said he was could change but i suspect that that a fantastic chef who put british cuisine on the map. is promised mr corbyn will try very ainsley harriet described him ha rd to is promised mr corbyn will try very hard to keep, and the focus would as a culinary icon. be, if you were to have that monica galletti said situation, the focus would be first
2:13 pm
ona situation, the focus would be first on a referendum on eu membership she was honoured to have known him. before you got to the question of another referendum on scottish independence. fascinating stuff, thank you, chris. president trump has been invited to send his lawyer to question jeremy corbyn says he has evidence witnesses at next week's public impeachment hearings that the nhs is at risk from a post—brexit trade deal in the us congress. with the united states. at a news conference this morning, the inquiry is looking the labour leader produced documents into whether mr trump pressurised which he said showed talks had taken ukraine to investigate his political place about drugs pricing rival, joe biden. donald trump denies the allegations. and access to nhs contracts. borisjohnson dismissed the claims police are investigating a double as total nonsense and said he could give an absolute cast iron shooting last night in merseyside. guarantee the nhs would not be two men, aged 35 and 31, on the table in trade talks. suffered gunshot wounds in the market tavern in newtown 0ur political correspondent, gardens. jessica parker, reports. police in liverpool are also 451 pages of unredacted investigating the shooting by masked gunmen of a woman in front documents and information. of her four—year—old daughter on sunday. all of it here. the director of blue story, brandishing these, it was intended the new film about london gangs which has been banned by some to be a dramatic moment. cinemas after a mass he claims these documents, brawl in birmingham, detailing meetings between us and uk has said the violence in cinemas had officials, prove the nhs is at risk nothing to do with the film.
2:14 pm
the vue chain has stopped showing from a conservative led brexit. blue story because it says there have been incidents in 16 more expensive drug prices, he says, of their theatres. runaway privatisation. rapman, who also wrote the film, has questioned whether there now we know, direct from the secret reports, are hidden reasons for the ban. that they never wanted you to see. vue insists its decision had the us is demanding that nothing to do with race. 0ur arts editor, will gompertz, our nhs is on the table in negotiations for a toxic deal. has been speaking to the filmmaker. fictional trouble on it is no secret that american the streets of london. companies want access real trouble on the to the uk drugs market but, in these piles and piles of documents, do you have evidence streets of birmingham. that uk ministers agreed that the health service should be the urban drama blue story part of trade talks? has become a news story after vue cinemas decided to pull it if you want to know from all its screens whether ministers were involved for what they claimed in these talks or not, was security reasons. a decision which has then they sanctioned the talks, astonished the director. i was thinking, what is the reason? they are obviously fully aware of the talks, and they are the ones that were declining to make the documents published. if, say, borisjohnson is the next does the owner have an issue prime minister and he wants to secure a trade deal with the us, with the urban youth? he is going to have to concede ground on a number of issues. i'm certain that the nhs
2:15 pm
is he prejudiced? will be one of them. is this a colour thing? so there is a big wad of paper you start going through to wade through and interpret all these things. it was an upsetting time. and labour will make its claims in terms of what these meetings, which we have heard the film is based on gangs and they have been in cinema of before, really amount to. watching it together. but those claims will be heavily contested. borisjohnson, visiting a hospital that reminds us of that. today, wasn't prime minister when these meetings took and leaving connected. place and said... there will be no sale of the nhs, no privatisation. did you ever think that it could be the nhs is not on the a lightning rod for trouble? table in any way. i knew it would attract the nhs is in no way on the table, a lot of young people and that was the aim. in no aspect whatever. it was the aim to have the cinema and this, as i say, is continually filled up with is—year—olds making brought up by the labour party as a diversionary tactic the choice whether to go down that from the difficulties route or that route. they are encountering. did i think people would be today's effort and a big pulling out a machete? moment for labour came after a series of difficult ones of course not. and no one did because forjeremy corbyn yesterday. of blue story anyway. how does it make you feel as a film—maker to have mr corbyn, are you fit for high office? this decision made? heavily criticised over his handling
2:16 pm
of anti—semitism allegations, he was asked again if he wanted to apologise to the jewish community. i made it very clear — anti—semitism is completely wrong in our society. i feel cheated. i'm always 0ur party did make it clear when i was elected leader and after that that anti—semitism is unacceptable in any form in our party or our society and, ifeel cheated. i'm always new i feel cheated. i'm always new it was not going to be easy. what does indeed, offered its sympathies and apologies to those that had suffered. while his shadow chancellor said this. this say about the next director we have said that and i will repeat trying to make the journey you have it again, i am really sorry the way taken? it will be a hard journey and we handled the issue because we learned the lessons when you get there it does not get easier, you will still get hit with from that and we have also invited people to say a hurdle, but we crack on, they take if there are still more lessons to be learned, come and see us and help us. oui’ a hurdle, but we crack on, they take our legs, we crawl. the chief talking about the nhs today, that is more comfortable territory forjeremy corbyn. executive said in a statement... politicians may find a path onto other topics but it isn't always easy. the leader of plaid cymru, adam price, has insisted that his demand for a future referendum about welsh independence is realistic.
2:17 pm
the party, which is defending four seats at the election, blue story is still being screened wants a referendum by 2030. by other cinema chains. mr price said support you're watching afternoon live. these are our headlines: for a breakaway is growing. the snp launches its election if you look at younger people, manifesto, warning that the uk may 54% now support independence. still leave europe without a deal and that there's it's theirfuture, you know, brexit—related chaos to come. that we are talking about and i think there is a realisation, look at the chaos of westminster in the last three and a half years. many, many people are coming the labour leader produces documents to the conclusion there has to be a better way, which he claims shows the government has discussed offering the united states access a welsh way of solving our problems. to the nhs after brexit. after a cinema chain bans a new film you're watching afternoon live. these are our headlines: about gangs after brawls broke out, the snp launches its election its director tells us his movie had manifesto, warning that the uk may still leave europe without a deal and that there's nothing to do with the violence. brexit—related chaos to come. the labour leader produces documents which he claims shows the government has discussed offering the united states access after spurs and manchester city to the nhs after brexit. reach the champions league knockout after a cinema chain bans a new film stages, it is liverpool and about gangs after brawls broke out, chelsea's turn. and matt taylor its director tells us his movie had
2:18 pm
nothing to do with the violence. returned to the squad after after spurs and manchester city recovering from cancer. and burton reached the knockout stages stokes has backed joe root. the of the champions league, tonight, it's liverpool and chelsea's turn. second test gets under tomorrow both sides can qualify with a win. evening. and tomorrow night, manchester united play astana in the europa league back now to the election, with 19—year—old max taylor, and discussions about climate change and the environment have played who's in the squad after a bigger part in the campaign recovering from cancer. so far than ever before. and all—rounder ben stokes has backed england captainjoe root so how do the main parties compare in their pledges? after his poor batting performance 0ur environment analyst, in the first test defeat against new zealand. roger harrabin, reports. the second test gets this year has been massive underway tomorrow evening. i'll be back with more on those for the environment in general and for climate change in particular. stories after half past. we've had the teenage campaigner greta thunberg. we've had extinction rebellion the celebrity chef gary rhodes has invading our streets. died at the age of 59. he presented bbc series including masterchef and rhodes around britain we've had dire warnings from scientists and we've had very and his restaurants were awarded powerful films from david attenborough. a record five michelin stars. so perhaps it's not surprising that, in the 30 years i've tributes have been paid by many
2:19 pm
reported this issue, of the country's best—known chefs. this is by far the greenest election. gordon ramsay said that gary rhodes parties are finally competing put british cuisine on the map over their climate offer. and marcus wareing said he will be they are fighting against each other remembered as a great british icon. to have the best climate policies 0ur entertainment correspondent, and that is brilliant. lizo mzimba, looks it's the worst of times back at his career. because we have started late and there is a huge amount to do when it came to kitchen cuisine, if we are to meet a net zero target. gary rhodes' flair for food so how are politicians responding made him a rock star chef, perhaps the first to to this massive challenge? really make cooking cool. well, most of them have set a target date by which the uk should you have got flavour, virtually eliminate those greenhouse gases that are you have got taste. superheating the planet. a really good question to ask, the question is, what the kitchen is so hot here... should that date be? it was more than 30 years so the greens say it ago that keith floyd filmed a young head chef should be done by 2030. at the michelin—starred castle hotel in taunton. but imagine the consequences of that. all petrol and diesel rhodes still in his mid—20s. cars off the road. all central heating boilers changed his firstjob was in amsterdam, for something cleaner. but his kitchen career, all homes super insulated. is that realistic? working in a hotel, was almost derailed. labour have given themselves running for a tram, a bit more wiggle room, he was hit by a van. the 2030s, they say. his head injury destroyed his senses lib dems say 2045. of taste and smell, crucial tools for a chef. and the conservatives, 2050. the doctor said, you haven't done
2:20 pm
the question is, what policies very well, and i said, what does this mean? are they going to put in place to achieve those ambitions? he said, it means you need a new career. and, for me, that was devastating. well, the green party say they will borrow £100 billion he did recover and, starting a year for cleaner buses, with hot chefs, landed a succession of high—profile cooking jobs. trains and massive home insulation. we are on the great british revival. labour say they will insulate every home and they've got a big spending policy for renewable power. if you are worried about those egg whites, make some meringues. 60 million is the number of trees he was one of those chefs i always wanted to watch work. that will be planted a year under i don't normally sit liberal democrat plans. there and watch other chefs doing demonstrations but, with gary, it was always something new. and the conservatives point to their record, saying his approachable personality meant that they have created a boom he was also in prime—time demand in offshore wind while they have been in government. they have also set world leading from the holiday programme... targets on climate change. i am a chef and they have sent me but some say they have undermined those targets touring but you won't catch by banning the cheapest form me doing any cooking. of energy, onshore wind. i am here to find out... ..to strictly. and what we have found this election is that yes, the green party have responded contemporaries have to the emergency that been paying tribute. gordon ramsay said he was the public have identified. a fantastic chef who put
2:21 pm
labour and the liberal democrats british cuisine on the map. are really getting to grips with it, ainsley harriet described him with a few areas that as a culinary icon. definitely need improving. monica galletti said but across the board, despite some good policies, the conservatives have not shown the ambition, the funding, she was honoured to have known him. or the policies that are needed to step up to addressing the climate emergency. the former editor of bbc good food magazine and food writer 0rlando murrin joins us from exeter. from a scientist's perspective, all of this should have happened 30 years ago. the bodies of 16 people who were found dead in a lorry in essex last month have arrived iam very back in vietnam. i am very glad to speak to you. it they were flown to hanoi airport isa before being taken by ambulance i am very glad to speak to you. it is a very sad day for the food world to their family homes. they were among 39 migrants who were and a real shock. i met gary when i found in the lorry in grays. became editor of bbc good food in several people have been arrested or charged. the late 90s and that was the time investigations are continuing when he was really taking off. he in the uk and in vietnam. was a kind of phenomenon. we have never seen was a kind of phenomenon. we have never seen anything like this before more protests have been held in malta against the prime minister, in the food world. there were big cookery names but to have someone joseph muscat, as police continue their investigation with such a following, he was into the murder of a journalist two years ago. adored. i remember the first time i
2:22 pm
daphne ca ruana galizia went to the good food show which is was investigating corruption in malta when she was killed. this enormous event in birmingham three senior government figures which is actually happening this stood down yesterday — weekend, but this was november 1997, they have all denied any involvement in her death. he was mobbed. there were crowds of they include the prime minister's chief of staff, who is now being questioned by police. mainly women of all ages who absolutely adored him and kind of worshipped him. it was a kind of the distinguished writer, director and broadcaster sirjonathan miller has died. beatles thing that happened. he was he was 85. the first chef to have that he found fame as a member of excitement fact about him. after that, he started to do a series of the beyond the fringe comedy revue. a man of many parts, he was also a photographer, one—man shows around the country. he sculptor and a qualified doctor. sarah campbell looks went touring and envy shows he did a bit of cooking, he talked, and he back at his long career. opera singing. sang and danced. he really was loved jonathan miller directing the opera by people. he was absolutely the don pasquale in florence. when you give him the soup, full performer. the other extraordinary thing is he was a you can go to the back really well qualified and talented chef. he was a michelin star winning and then go, "hello". chef. he was a michelin star winning chef. hearing his voice again when he was one of the world's great opera directors,
2:23 pm
an accomplished theatre director, your report makes me feel so sad a television presenter, a humorist, an artist and sculptor, because i remember him so well. an all—round intellectual, and a lapsed medic. underneath the hysteria that perkins, sorry to drag you away surrounded him at that time, he was from the fun, old boy. that's all right, sir. the war is not going very well, you know. a deeply serious, incredibly oh, my god! his life changed in 1960 professional, talented creative and when the trainee doctor imaginative chef. i would not say was invited to join the cast that about many people if of beyond the fringe — the ground—breaking satirical revue practically anyone. he had talent in also starred alan bennett, spades. most of all, he worked peter cook and dudley moore. i want you to lay down your life. extremely hard, he was known to be a yes, sir. we need a futile gesture at this stage. real workaholic. his demonstrations its success was immense. which were packed out, he wanted to it transferred from edinburgh to london and then to new york. know exactly what he was doing miller's medical career never recovered. beforehand, he was scrupulous. there don't come back. was no just walking right you are. beforehand, he was scrupulous. there was nojust walking on beforehand, he was scrupulous. there was no just walking on and beforehand, he was scrupulous. there was nojust walking on and having fun on stage, he was really cooking. goodbye, perkins. and in his restaurants, he was a god, i wish i was going too. goodbye, sir. or is it au revoir? very fun taskmaster. people who no, perkins. learn from him admired him enormously, but he was very hold your tongue. i won't! determined and the result, and what off with her head! he moved into television, he made in his restaurants, we can
2:24 pm
making films like this 1960s acid watches tv programmes until the end of time that we cannot ever eat his trip version of alice in wonderland. if you prick us, do we not bleed? food again or experience what it was like to see this exciting, soon he was directing plays as well including laurence olivier, no less, as sha kespeare's shylock. beautiful, creative food arrive on and if you wrong us, the plate, and the fact that he shall we not revenge! managed to revive british cuisine as if we are like you in the rest well as doing all that by taking we will resemble you in that! traditional british dishes and making them high restaurant blood vessels, heart and intestine, bladder and lungs... achievements, this force quite he presented a medical series on television, wonderful, and we had not seen it the body in question. before. and before i let you go, one and said his training as a doctor helped his work with actors. last little question, and you have i had been taught to look for the small details, arrived at this question yourself, by means of which the doctor infers what was the favourite thing, the what might be wrong, little tiny details of how most special thing, that you ever people carry themselves, how they talk. ate cooked by him? oh, i remember... these negligible details which you are trained to keep your eye open his thing was to take something we for were absolutely all all knew of and then make it... that the theatre was about. magic it up into something small and ravishing and beautiful and involving an enormous amount of
2:25 pm
some of his operas stayed work. i remember a lobster the in the repertory for decades. though the critics middle, a rich dish, but when it sometimes sneered. came out it had colour and beauty. the thin—skinned miller took that badly, perversely claiming he was underappreciated in britain. beef wellington was unrecognisable except when you ate it was everything that a beef wellington should be, and i wanted to say that i get asked less to do things now much less than i used to. this christmas day, one of my i mean in england, i don't get all—time favourite gary rhodes asked to do anything. some indeed thought him dishes is smoked salmon gateau which too clever by half. his versatility made him a figure of fun. it didn't stop him, late in life, you simply layer up with slices of starting to make abstract sculptures out of metal. smoked salmon with delicious cream cheese and herbs, the recipe is on if you are here singing, i think the good food website, i will make you need to be a little bit more it on christmas day, then you slice facing that direction. he was an egotist who could be it on christmas day, then you slice devastatingly rude, but he was also it into wedges because it is a kind a superb educator and entertainer, of cake, and it is so simple and playful, occasionally pretentious, rarely predictable. beautiful and show gary because it is an original, no one had ever done it before. we will all miss him so time for a look at the weather. much and i wish his family and wife so much and i wish his family and wife so much sympathy. thanks so much for coming to talk to us about him on such a sad day, and thank you very we will start on the other side of
2:26 pm
much for reminding us about the the pond. these pictures are not smoked salmon gateau, we can all do from anywhere in the uk. if they that on christmas day and remember were, we have got it very wrong for him. please make it on christmas day today, but these pictures come from in memory of dear gary. colorado. some spots hey have seen over 80 centimetres of snow, the director of blue story, the new film about london gangs which has been banned by some blizzard conditions, and the cinemas after a mass brawl in birmingham, travelling conditions have been has said the violence in cinemas had nothing to do with the film. appalling. and now more than ever thatis appalling. and now more than ever that is causing problems in the the vue chain has stopped showing blue story because it says states because tomorrow is there have been incidents in 16 of their theatres. thanksgiving. and everybody needs to rapman, who also wrote the film, get together. everybody needs to get back to wherever their families are has questioned whether there are hidden reasons for the ban. so back to wherever their families are so disruption to air travel and also vue insists its decision had nothing to do with race. huge problems on the roads, making 0ur arts editor, will gompertz, it very difficult for people to get to where they need to be. this has been speaking to the film—maker. particular storm on our radar fictional trouble on picture, a lot of snow through the streets of london. real trouble on the colorado moving up into the midwest. streets of birmingham. we have had samples and the urban drama blue story has thunderstorms, freezing rain in some become a news story after vue spots, so a real mix of winter cinemas decided to pull it from all its screens weather making things very for what they claimed was security reasons.
2:27 pm
troublesome, but that's not the end a decision which has of it either. we will spin the globe astonished the director. i was thinking, what is the reason? a little bit and look at it even deeper. i will show you the satellite picture. a few things to point out. watch the way in which does the owner have an issue this lump of cloud develops this with the urban youth? little hook here. this shows that is he prejudiced? the low pressure is deepening rapidly. it has undergone explosive is it a colour thing? you start going through all these things. psycho i could then assess. it means an area of low pressure that deepens it was an upsetting time. the film is based on gangs dramatically. it has gone more than and they have been in cinema watching it together. 24 dramatically. it has gone more than 2a millibars down in terms of pressure in terms of 2a hours bringing further snow over there. i that reminds us of that. will have to hand back to you. we and leaving connected. will have to hand back to you. we will have to leave the explosive psycho genesis! we have to go over did you ever think that it could be a lightning rod for trouble? i knew it would attract to truro and listen into the prime a lot of young people and that was the aim. minister. my father was born in it was the aim to have the cinema penzance. his grandfather lived filled up with 15—year—olds making the choice whether to go down that
2:28 pm
here. i was running along the beach in st ives this morning very slowly route or that route. in the dark and the rain and the did i think people would be wind. i thought, in the dark and the rain and the wind. ithought, why in the dark and the rain and the pulling out machetes? wind. i thought, why are we doing this at this time of year? why are of course not. and no one did because we having an election on the 12th of december? we all know the answer. of blue story anyway. because parliament will not get brexit done, and we are totally how does it affect you, as a film—maker, that this film has been pulled? blockaded, and we have got to get on i feel cheated. with it. and until we get brexit it is always an upwards hurdle, done, this country as a whole cannot coming from my background. move forward together in the way the last thing i thought that we want. and in the last few was a cinema would ban us from every single site. days, we have seen from their ma nifestos days, we have seen from their manifestos were all the other parties would do when it comes to getting brexit done. they would stop what do you think this sort at! one way or the other the liberal of decision says to the next rapman, trying to make the same journey you have made? democrats are neither liberal nor it is just telling them, it will be a hard journey, democratic! they want to reverse it. and, when you get there, it will not get any easier. the scots endlessly want a second but we crack on. they take our legs, we crawl. referendum on scottish independence,
2:29 pm
it is all they are ever interested in. they also want to block labour —— brexit. as for the labour party, they of course want to block brexit the chief executive but they want to have a second referendum on a deal yet to be done of vue international said... by mr corbyn when we do not yet know what mr corbyn‘s position would be blue story is still being screened on that deal. he said he would be neutral on the deal that he proposes himself to secure. it is an by other cinema chains. extraordinary state of affairs for someone extraordinary state of affairs for someone to not revealed to the electorate what position he proposes let's speak now to kehinde andrews, to ta ke electorate what position he proposes to take on the most important issue professor of black studies at birmingham city university and author of ‘back to black: facing this country. he is used to retelling black radicalism for the 21st century‘. being indecisive but now he is not he‘s in our birmingham newsroom. what do you make of this row?m so sure! he has been sitting on the fence for so long the iron will what do you make of this row? it is an institutional racism double enter his soul. i was at goon hilly earth station earlier on today standard. we had horrendous violence scanning the heavens, and i wondered whether that incredible equipment
2:30 pm
in the dark knight in colorado a few might be able to detect the black yea rs in the dark knight in colorado a few years ago, but no one suggested that hole at the heart of labour's brexit was because of the movie and there policy because i can't work out what was because of the movie and there was no suggestion of pulling the movie. you see violence all the they will do. and i think frankly, time, gangster movies are the most popular. it is strange that this if the labour opposition cannot give would mean that because there was violence at a cinema showing, movie leadership on that vital question, i do not see how they can lead this needs to be pulled from the screens. country next year or how mr corbyn we heard from the film—maker rapman has the leadership to do it. we need who said the message to other young film—makers is, this is a very tough to get brexit done because we are a journey. his line, if you take our democracy. and whether we voted legs we will crawl, we will not give leave or remain, most people in this up, is that that determination country want us to come together and within the community of young black move forward and respect the will of the people. don't you think so? i film—makers to overcome what you are describing them as institutional do. racism? let's get it done. and that would i would hope so. and it is notjust give everybody a chance in a punch for movie—makers. you have seen this to build a new partnership with a kind of things but the culture itself is to blame for causing the european press, get on and do that. violence, and it makes it really we have been held back in so many difficult for black film—makers or
2:31 pm
ways by this stasis, there is a musicians to get on the screen. just political blockade, there is a think about how if you like movies reticulated python that has are made, and this is pulled from swallowed it tapir or something. if the screen because of the u nfortu nate the screen because of the unfortunate actions of some young i have got that right. that's what people. rapman, in that your politics resembles, and this is conversation, seem to be seen that actually watching the movie would a die 00 election if you like, to help young people think about this clear the blockage, and get it done. abroad, they pulled off a violent, and it is not so much about the and what it might entail, and what might into the top and he was implying that it might help to make advantages of brexit, though they a different choice. do you think are, in my view, very considerable thatis a different choice. do you think that is true? i think that is the to this country — organising our own irony of taking the movie of the screen. irony of taking the movie of the screen. the whole point of the film regulation to suit the needs of the is to prevent youth violence, and we uk economy, or cutting vat, or have a society of the kids are growing up in very difficult having a free porch, free trade, situation. there is violence on the streets, and the movie are trying to having a free porch, free trade, having our own australian style solve that, and we should be talking about the issues that create the points—based immigration system to case of violence in birmingham, and sort out immigration in this country at long last. there are many advantages to brexit, but actually it is about more than that. it is the dribble of the font makes a about responding to the call of the marginalisation of the young people country to do things differently and farmers. and a question on the better. and when people voted for handling by the cinema chains. we
2:32 pm
brexit, they were also voting for a different approach to our economy, and a different way of bringing the saw showcase, another that what country together. 70.4 million scots might suspend a choice, and people voted for change, and we are then put them back on with a greater going to do things differently and security. it‘s out to break that vue better, and unite and level up across the whole country. —— 17.4 should also have handled it? the million. we need better spokesperson from vue said this is infrastructure, we need fantastic not about the phone, it is an gigabit broadband and 4g mobile isolated issue, this movie has done a lot of rock, it has been lots of telephony, which we are outlining screens, under is been no violence. today, because it is about public the firm had nothing to do with the services, about investing in great public services and it is a lot on environment. maybe there are there is a pledge card about it. i pressures we ca n environment. maybe there are pressures we can take on particular areas of their art problems, but you hope you have got a copy. do you can‘t get caught in whole community. need me to recite the details? you this farm is positive, and i would know what we are going to do with in recommend you go and see. it is not hospitals. 40 new hospitals across a very positive message. thank you the country, including many in the very much for talking to resource west country. that is about afternoon. time for a look at the weather. investing and more police and the west country. 20,000 initially, under 20,000 across the whole country. levelling up funding for
2:33 pm
education across the whole country. we have got to a is currently affecting the usa in the run—up to up education across the whole country. up to £4000 per year per pupil in thanksgiving. 0ne affecting the usa in the run—up to thanksgiving. one that has already brought over 80 centimetres of snow primary school, £5,000 in the to parts of colorado, making up secondary schools. making sure until a to parts of colorado, making up untila mid to parts of colorado, making up eve ryo ne secondary schools. making sure everyone has better access to until a mid press. you can see the travel disruption that that is causing, come up with a lot of after—school clubs, giving people trying to get to where they wraparound childcare. we believe in are going. that‘s some continue to drift each foot at the moment. you having fantastic public services, and we can do these things without can seats not moving up into the midwest. the event has been pretty ruining the economy of this country heavy, freezing rain coming out stop you going to have a different simplicity. but that is not the end of the story, because when big spend approach, but we can do these things it go further west, there is another whilst bearing down on taxation, stop, and that one is undergoing keeping, without raising either income tax or vat or national explosive cycle genesis. that means an area of low pressure that is a insurance contribution. and at the same time, we can make fantastic deepening very rapidly. this one is investment in infrastructure in deepened by close to 50 millibars education and in technology. the 30, and 24 others, double what you would need to call it explosive. what is the hc03, we are going to do that. going on as a air has been digging we are going to do the railway line. into the back. this lump of cloud turns into a coral, and then turns
2:34 pm
it is about time we sorted that out. into a swell. it looks almost like a cinnamon swirl. that‘s kind of real and this is the right moment to do wrap—up of cloud, and notjust it. we mentioned earlier on, this is restores that the storm is intensifying. it has brought ones on the coast of around 100 knots per the moment to be investing in hour. it is no weakening as a jet technology, not just broadband inland, but some of these pointless the moment to be investing in technology, notjust broadband and 4g technology, notjust broadband and 46 but technology, notjust broadband and 4g but stuff like a fantastic space areas and the west, the cascades of programme. these are going to be sierra nevada, both the cascades of long term jobs for the united sierra nevada, both the cascades of sierra nevada, both the cascades of sierra nevada, pudsey a metre of snow or more. still pretty abundant. kingdom. it is wonderful what is happening at newquay. and by the more moisture from the site as well, bid, there is going to be another this means more distruption and the point in scotland as well. in ten all—important run—up to thanksgiving. but is mounted with yea rs point in scotland as well. in ten years time, this country will be a space technology satellite us? much milder. it will get a bit superpower because of the investments we a re colder, but not that cold. things superpower because of the investments we are making now. it is going to be good for the uk. are changing over the next couple of days. brightness a run for some of those at the moment, which will scotland, kampl. .. you become more widespread as we head to going to be good for the uk. scotland, kampl... you are talking about investing in every part of the the end of the week. for many more, united kingdom. infrastructure, bring to contend with. that was short a little bit earlier on. and education, technology. bringing the ifi short a little bit earlier on. and if i show you the ridder picture, whole country together, levelling up and uniting. that is what i think this is where it has been growing. the people of this country want to heavy downpours in wales and southern england. it is that any see. they want to see there is
2:35 pm
potential of this entire country on this, and that is why we need to get gives was cause for concern understructure gives was cause for concern understructu re and, because gives was cause for concern brexited on. it is not rocket understructure and, because that is piling and across north—east science, except obviously when it england. it is going to get into isn't rocket science, and in the case of what we are doing in newquay parts of the scotland is about. could well be an offering to give localised flooding and travel disruption, and many of these areas and in caithness. how can we do all of course have already seen floating over recent weeks. that is one to of this? what is at the heart of our keep an eye on. elsewhere tuna, the regulars out of northern scotland. philosophy? it is very, very simple. drierfor northern we see the balance and asymmetry in regulars out of northern scotland. drier for northern ireland, regulars out of northern scotland. drierfor northern ireland, wales and its output. 0ne the uk economy between fantastic drierfor northern ireland, wales and its output. one or two showers open, and generally quite a magnet. five to 9 degrees pretty much covers public services, between sorting out the roads and railway lines and it. still going to do what across education and all those things that northern england. some getting into we need to do, and a dynamic market northern ireland and sinking into wales, parts of the midlands, down economy. which we believe in. and to the south we will see brighter skies and one or two showers. skies indeed i think we are the only party are bright to the north, but we see contesting this election when she are bright to the north, but we see truly understands and believes and a brisk northerly wind. that will the importance of wealth creation, make it feel cold across the as far as northern half of the uk. the importance of wealth creation, as farasi the importance of wealth creation, as far as i can make it. do you not think so? temperatures are around 8 degrees and glasgow, but still in double digits towards the south. i was sure applause
2:36 pm
yourfreighter, digits towards the south. i was sure your freighter, because all of us and so we think when people get up get in to this and feel of northerly early in the morning to get their wind. cold airsinking get in to this and feel of northerly business read it, whether it is a wind. cold air sinking across the uk. temperatures to start friday cider press or whatever, one they morning below freezing and pretty. come up with a bug idea for some new quite a widespread frost away from the far side. some cloud and a little bit of patchy rain to do was, product, or whatever it happens to but further north, we see brighter skies as spells of sunshine. still a be, and they decide to find a new market, but at home or abroad, where noticeable breeze and one or two the risk their own money, take out a showers on the north—eastern coast. mortgage to invest in some new some of the choppers could be product line, we don't sneer at wintry, because the afternoon temperatures just four to 8 degrees. those people. we cheerfor them. they are the backbone of our but weekend will bring more of this economy, and we support them. weather. 0ne fly in the ointment, an area of low pressure. uncertainty applause about how much progress there is public, but there is certainly the and that is why we can do all of potential offering to scrape through this, as we can also cut national southern counties, certainly the insurance and cut business taxes, channel islands on saturday. maybe and to be well in our first even some snow over high ground in the south—west. it will keep an eye parliament, and our first and to be well in our first parliament, and ourfirst budget, if we are lucky enough to be returned on that. but further north, it is on for the 12. and what would jeremy fine and dry, some sunshine, temperatures between five and 10 corbyn and mcdonnell do? it would be degrees. we stuck with the rather
2:37 pm
chilly feel on a sunday. we will see absolutely ruinous economic some spells of sunshine and some disasters. putting up taxes for showers i did noticeable northerly breeze. a touch of the cargo, mild everybody in this country for about and wet weather we have had £2400 per taxpayer. i don't know if recently, a change on the way, it is going to turn brighter but colder. anybody saw an interview last night that is all from me for now. with the carbon impact she was perfectly clear that the burden of we are going to go over to a liberal taxation would fall on everybody. it is worse than that full because what democrat news conference, and you can see a surprising face arty would happen is that the scale of democrat event, michael heseltine. the spending and borrowing rate to be marked down internationally, and uk debt would cost more, and interest rates would go up, peoples mortgages would be affected, and it all over this country, there are men and women whose loyalties to a would be economically ruinous for our country. that is not likely political party in this election forward. that is not the way to do it. and i don't think it is sensible have been stretched beyond breaking to keep our economy in suspense and point, and i hope the british public the way that carbon is proposing to will take note of the fact that do with his alliance with nicola whilst politicians, people like me, sturgeon by having yet more
2:38 pm
delectable disputation about the do not account on the trust of the european union and another referendum next year. ijust wait times and prevents people making people by and large, we are all in investments. it is a total drag it for what we can get out of it, we anchor on the uk. and that i say, i never listen, we don‘t care. you think it is amazing that we still know all the words. there are men don't know what to deal mr corbyn and women whose commitment to their proposes to do he would be in favour country, our country, their sense of of it or not. and i canjust what matters to britain, where the imagine, how is he supposed to get future of britain at lord‘s, where that deal in brussels? with what the future of the younger generation conviction is supposed to carry in those negotiations? can you the lies, means that they have torn up scene? act one, scene one, enter their traditional loyalties, and mark butcher stage left, once your there are people who will vote and there are people who will vote and there are people who will vote and there are people who are standing barrier is there and he says once mr for election have put behind them the traditional loyalties to the party because of the perceived corbyn, how are you? tell us about this wonderful deal that you want to greater loyalty to their country. and i want to salute those people, do quoi? you mean, what you are not those politicians who have risked even sure if you are in favour of it
2:39 pm
everything — in their careers, an order to be able to say i stood by yourself? but... then who is in favour of it? mr mcdonald? mr my convictions, and i voted for my national interest. i am here as a starmer? mrs abbott? are they in favour of it? i'm afraid the answer proud member of the conservative is no, and it is only one person party. 0urjoint it in 1955, in backin is no, and it is only one person back injeremy corbyn's deal, and thatis back injeremy corbyn's deal, and that is jeremy back injeremy corbyn's deal, and that isjeremy corbyn, and even he isn't backing it. it is a totally 0ctober farcical situation, or it would be party. 0urjoint it in 1955, in october of 1955, when our leader was comical if it was not so disastrous sir winston churchill. and i have for the uk economy. and my friends, ijust ask you for the uk economy. and my friends, i just ask you to look at the served in government‘s led by ted distinction between opposition and us. distinction between opposition and us. we have a deal that ready to go, heath, margaret thatcher, john it is often ready. just bung it in, major, david cameron, and i did so and it will be done after christmas. with great pride — indeed, those of it will be done before christmas, by the bay. it is there to go. 0ur you who opposed my party over those it will be done before christmas, by the bay. it is there to go. our 635 conservative candidates at this decades may have seen me as the election have signed up to this
2:40 pm
deal. there has never been such an ruffian and the centre of the battle outbreak of harmony and the ground. there were a few great conservative party. confrontations in which i played a part. i make no claim to be a part of that i but one — whatever the applause battle was thickest, i was under the centre of it. whether it was a from every point of view, we went across all the spectrum of views and posting nationalisation programmes, across all the spectrum of views and a wonderful party. people are coming for there it was seeking to reduce together to back this deal because they care about the country and they state power and fighting love their country and they want to denationalisation, whether it was see it move forward. and they want the battle over cnd or selling of to get brexit done so that we can get on with our one nation the battle over cnd or selling of the council houses, i was there. for conservative agenda of levelling up my party. but throughout that entire the country, and that is what we are going to do if we are lucky enough to be returned with a working majority. we will get a parliament that works for you. i hope we can time, there was, for my party, one all work together to achieve that. let's continue to develop our overriding argument that we deployed amazing green technologies, in which and argued for. it was the one scene this part of the world saw its sales, and must be carbon neutral by
2:41 pm
2015 and corbyn neutral by christmas, which i think we can of post—imperial britain, and it achieve. argued that we should target our applause destiny for this country at the and let's make sure that we take heart of europe. the incredible this country forward and to take the words of sir winston himself— we south—west forward with sensible, moderate tax cutting but must create a kind of united states of europe. it gives the lie to all compassionate conservative politics. that is what we are going to do if those who had no idea what the we are lucky enough to be returned. journey was about. harold it isa we are lucky enough to be returned. it is a big, big contest and ahead of us, but with your help, i think macmillan‘s incredible speech, the we can do it. thank you all very much for listening today. thank you. wind of change, depicting our applause imperial past as the past, and pointing forward to a journey in thank you. i'm going to go to partnership with our european colleagues. i had the privilege of being the first minister in the british government to speak and the united states of america after we thomson from the bbc. when you were had a joint european union in 1973, andi had a joint european union in 1973, and i was able to articulate as i
2:42 pm
believed then the new partnership elected leader, you said you were going to fix the crisis in social care, it was one of your priorities. across the atlantic, a partnership lam look care, it was one of your priorities. i am look at this get brexit done, of equals in which the united kingdom would play its full part in what is going to happen for the south—west. i can't see or here at all. not a lot of detail in the admiration of the united states, but manifesto, are just as people won't have to sell houses to pay for care. in partnership with the other european countries. and then of don't you think voters, particularly something like cornwall, to a bit course i served in it mrs thatcher‘s more detail? thank you. it is a government, where in the name of a british self—interest, we shared massive issue, and i wasjust at sovereignty on the scale without precedent in history by signing up more detail? thank you. it is a massive issue, and i was just at a hospital this morning talking to to the single european act. many of staff about the pressures that they face as a result of the social care those who listen to what i say tonight will have travelled that crisis. it often is the interface journey with me, but there were many between the councils and the nhs, from other parties who will not have where things go wrong, under burden is absolutely cute at the moment. what we have done for this new travelled along the same road. but conservative government, as we have whatever journey we took through the bid 1.5 billion into immediate cycling of the cost of social care
2:43 pm
for local authorities, both for second half of the 20th century, adults and kids, and just for under the first quarter of this, immediate properties. we have also said we are going to have another there is one thing that has brought billion a yearfor the us there is one thing that has brought us all together — we will never vote said we are going to have another billion a year for the life of the next parliament to deal with the to make this country poorer, we will extra cost that social care is imposing. we are going to work on never vote to make this country less influential on the world stage. we what i think is a growing national consensus about this issue, that we need as a country to come together are united across the political and agree on the way forward, and i divide in our conviction that it is think as with the nhs, people can our duty, our personal duty, to see the rough outlines of what we need to do. and there are two key fight for british influence whatever power exists and in the modern principles. number one, everybody must have dignity and security in world. we are british in a united old age. number two, must have dignity and security in old age. numbertwo, nobody europe. and we are proud of what must have dignity and security in old age. number two, nobody should have to sell their home to pay the cost of their care. and that is at the plant that we will be bringing that europe has created. it has not forward. and we will work across been just that europe has created. it has not beenjust a that europe has created. it has not been just a means of forging rising living standards for the countless politics to get that done. i am
2:44 pm
going to go to david wood of itv. millions of our people, important though that has been. it has been you were this morning and she had first hand from nurses at the that we have driven towards pressures that they face. the royal communism and fascism from the cornwall hospital is on its second dictionary of european politics. we have seen the end of the kernel and highest level of alert, and we have not really had a cold snap. must be, people sent pictures from that hospital of ambulances queueing in greece —— the end of the colonels around the back, with patients not in greece. we are proud to have been having room and the a&e. the trust and the county apologise. i do sorry able to confront the extremes that for the states of this county's nhs are so able to confront the extremes that are so beset our european past, and now, after ten years of a we are proud to have shared our conservative government? of course i understand the pressures that the national public with nations like ours so national public with nations like ours so that we can collectively nhs is under. i really see what people are having to cope with — the exercise and influence in the century that is unfolding way above numbers. 0ne people are having to cope with — the numbers. one of the things that is happening at the moment of course as our population is getting older, anything that we as nation states people are using the nhs more and could do so on our own. 0ne more, and by and large, people do an incredible job more, and by and large, people do an incrediblejob and more, and by and large, people do an incredible job and our more, and by and large, people do an incrediblejob and our nhs, but they are under huge pressure. here and anything that we as nation states could do so on our own. one of the
2:45 pm
more extreme and unreliable claims the south—west, we are putting another 450 million in immediately, of the present election campaign is because you are right to say that that we can‘t get brexited done on a the government came in nine years ago, but we are taking a new approach, and i make no bones about date last month of this year. it is it. particularly when it comes to funding the nhs. this is our priority, it has to be done. we are technically true that boris johnson putting 100 million into our royal could get a parliamentary majority cornwall hospital, as i think you and the ensuing election to enable know. we are operating true though, him to get the legislation through putting a lot into children, and i parliament which would set him on a think a new maternity unit there. —— day journey to take parliament which would set him on a dayjourney to take britain out of putting a lot into truro. we will europe. but that does not take us continue to invest and the nhs, not just in the short term, we are out of europe. all it does is to putting 34 billion and it now, but is the biggest amount in modern come up like a sort of a boxer about memory, but we will continue to to enter the ring, he will take us invest in the nhs for the long term, because we can manage the economy sensibly, and to deliver the to enter the ring, he will take us toa to enter the ring, he will take us to a position for the real debate,
2:46 pm
reve nu es sensibly, and to deliver the revenues that the society will need the real punch—up, begins. and there to pay for a fantastic nhs. and that is no search and enter to that, but is our pledge to you, our guarantee. there is one certain consequence, we will deliver 50,000 brought that the uncertainty that has notches, and yes some of them will brought large part of the investment be returned, but there will also be huge numbers of new nurses. we will and this country to a halt will be perpetuated all through next year as have 6000 more gps, many more physiotherapist, and we will do it by sensible management of the the rival claims of the nation economy. and i have to say that it states of europe also very the deal is not only that i think mr corbyn's economic prospectus is utterly that we want, and, being human, they ruinous and will take a sledgehammer to the viability of the uk economy, will all put on the table the deals but schemes like the four day week that they want. and no one has the would be absolutely catastrophic for the sensible management of all first idea except that it will take an unpredictable period of time that public services, including the nhs. no one has the first idea what will so, ithink public services, including the nhs. so, i think that our report of one nation conservative approach, is the be on offer at the end of that best way forward. i am not going to process , be on offer at the end of that process, or one of the process plant. but one thing you do not, the decide from you, david, this is our priority, and we want to get brexit deal on offer may not be acceptable done so that we can get on with it. to the british people, and then, in richard whitehouse from cornwall i. order to fulfil the manifesto
2:47 pm
commitment of mrjohnson, we have to cornwall council has had to make live with no deal. the worst of all savings of £370 million since 2010, and it says this is because of conceivable options. still on the government cuts. is it fair that you table at an unpredictable period in made it to boiling point pledge as a an unpredictable set of key part of investment? shouldn't circumstances. so, next year, it‘s you be addressing funding for the one of uncertainty. of course, you government? of course, we are pretty much more money into local government, particularly to address may travel with the optimism of the needs of adult social care, and those who think that the loss of i think at least some of that too but you will be spread through local european trade, nearly half of all councils and so far as they have our trade, is of a balance. let us responsibility, but i will check that. but we are pretty much more be neutral in our language. a money into local government. the crisis in local government is balance, because mr trump will ride particular around social care, and thatis to the rescue of the united kingdom. particular around social care, and that is where the money is going first. on the 2 billion for portals, well, you may believe that. i don‘t i can't believe it is all going to know how many of you will believe be spent by the department for transport, but i will check that. it, but i would offer a word of caution. mr trump is fighting for
2:48 pm
his political life, and curiously enough, he is going to be fighting for his political life more or less the whole period when mrjohnson thinks he‘s going to get the deal from mr trump. and thinks he‘s going to get the deal from mrtrump. and i thinks he‘s going to get the deal from mr trump. and i don‘t know a great deal about american politics, that means hello and welcome to but i think i have a sort of inkling cornwall, for those who don't understand. you are a long way from about mrtrump and westminster. add your manifesto, you but i think i have a sort of inkling about mr trump and american politics, that it has a national said you would produce a white paper flavour about it. it is not a on devolution to the regions. but here we are in a beautiful place and national british flavour, it is — but it is a very socially deprived — surprise, surprise— an american bridges can be up to £4 an hour glass and national average. how is flavour. and in the united states, so flavour. and in the united states, soi flavour. and in the united states, so i read in the newspapers and see your devolution agenda going to address situations like that, and on television, there is a hard core how can our cornish identity be of american public opinion but actually likes mr trump and trusts guaranteed? thank you very much. on mrtrump, actually likes mr trump and trusts mr trump, because every time he says he will put america first and wages, i believe any high wage high americanjobs first, he will put america first and skill economy, but it is possible... american jobs first, and american deals first, the thrill with
2:49 pm
that is why we are letting up the living wage by the biggest ever expectation and excitement, because increase. i think that will help they feel betrayed. so, partner people on low incomes. also cutting comes to helping borisjohnson, national insurance for all people on low incomes. i think that should be fighting for a very different electorate in a very different part a priority. we have record low of the world, how many times as mr unemployment at the moment, and it trump going to risk his presidential isa unemployment at the moment, and it is a fantastic thing, but people do fragility, majority, an order to feel the squeeze, they do feel the help his friend across the atlantic? cost of living, and we must address. well, let‘s not diminish the skill in one of the reasons i've massively of his friends. he has two friends. expanded living which when i was running london is because i came to he has nigel farage. that does not the conclusion that it was actually going to help increase productivity of many businesses, and would create a greater loyalty and greater underestimate, boris has its allies and has friends, but if you are performance, and it does. and i going to go for the future of the think it is right that people should be properly paid, so we will be united kingdom on the credibility of doing that. it will be elapses but i the generosity of mr trump and the accept that it is not the only thing that matters. you have also got to far—sighted global wisdom of nigel reduce the sense of remoteness that some people have, that is why i talk
2:50 pm
farage, you will understand why i some people have, that is why i talk cannot take the journey with you. i so much about technology, broadband, 4g and five g and so on. all that, have left your company. i will vote we have got to do, because that for british self—interest, and those people who are standing in its name. promotes people's sense of possibility in their lives. plus, bus routes. buses. iam but then if they say we will take possibility in their lives. plus, bus routes. buses. i am a fanatic back control. you can‘t deny that? about buses, and i think that you can do it hugely right with a decent what a thrilling thought, that we rural bus network. we will be doing will be in charge. be able to thump that as well. on your point about the cornish language, i am not very them if we don‘t like what they‘re doing, stand up and be proud, take back control. i only have one really proficient in cornish. i don't think i will any cornish, but obviously it significant question that seems to me to flow from this alexia of isa i will any cornish, but obviously it is a wonderful thing for people to celebrate their heritage and have an understanding of it, and i would new—found power — what are you going certainly want to encourage local to do with it? what control are you authorities, local government, devolved government, to champion cornish and to make sure that it is going to exercise? show me the changes that you have in mind so spoken and it be that you obviously that we will all benefit from this
2:51 pm
do. i think i was in wales two days dramatic exercise that you are talking about. why don‘t you publish ago, and! do. i think i was in wales two days ago, and i learnta do. i think i was in wales two days ago, and i learnt a wonderful part the regulations that you intend to in wells. i wonder if it is the same change? so that we all know for this in cornish. i was trying to describe journey ends. well, i‘m sorry to have to charge you, but i have a our deal, and i said it was often deep suspicion i know why they don‘t ready. and i said in wells, you could put it in the microwave, which publish the details, because what is and if the amount of the more extreme members of the tory party, i and welsh... what is the cornish for doubt must make it clear, i do not believe all conservatives think like microwave? this, because all conservatives have laughter created the very apparatus that some anyway, i am all in favour of the conservatives now say they want to undermine, andi conservatives now say they want to undermine, and i was proud to have been part of the one nation encouragement and celebration of local traditions and language, and tradition that built the regulations we should certainly be doing that. that make you doubly civilised andy valentine from heart radio. you place. so, why don‘t they publish the regulations that will change the say that the labour party's conditions of the workplace? the
2:52 pm
allegations about the nhs have been conditions of the workplace? the conditions of the workplace? the conditions of our environment? what discussed in trade talks are total is to happen with their health and nonsense , discussed in trade talks are total nonsense, if that is the case, can safety? is to happen with their health and safety ? a nd is to happen with their health and safety? and i will tell you why they will not publish them — because they you explain why the document showed it was discussed and why this are frightened of the impact it will conversation is happen? i'm sorry, have on public opinion in this it isa election if people had the first conversation is happen? i'm sorry, it is a total nonsense, and it is idea of what they will do with the endlessly repeated by the liberal proper that they say they want to party that the nhs is somehow up for begin. and do you know, it is the sale, are going to be negotiated on a trade deal. nothing could be same story with emigration. now, i further from the truth. that will not happen under this government or indeed any conservative government. do not in any way wish to and i think what you have heard from you today is our commitment to the nhs. it is all reason why the labour underestimate the deep emotional party continues to bring this up, feelings that immigration creates in which is a total invention, it is every society, in every part of the because they seek to distract from the great divide at the heart of the world, once people of all colours principal policy of this election, and all treaties, there is a human which is about brexit. and it is clear from the interview last night element, and it is best to admitted thatjeremy corbyn not only its and understand it, because unless you do, you never learn how to fight refusing to campaign for his own
2:53 pm
deal, but you can't find anybody and it. and i have again in my lifetime the labour party to do the job for him. and in the face of that kind of being at the forefront of the vacuum of leadership, to say nothing experience of verse and a structure. it so happened that as a very young of the vacuum of leadership they are man, my first experiences, i had a sure new when it comes to cracking down on anti—semitism and the party, very small hotel in london. so, we i think that is why this nonsense is are going to leave lord heseltine continually spouted, but none did they are taking the long view. a it. and what people do is get brexit speech that began with him done and get on with taking this explaining that he joined the conservative party in 1965 points of country forward, uniting, levelling up, and as i say, making investment winston churchill was leader of this party, and explaining the pressures, in the nhs on a scale not seen for a the brexit pressures, doubts have generation, which we are only be can forced him to step up to the make, because we are a one nation microphone at a liberal democrat party that also understands the event to talk about his desire to do importance of a dynamic economy. and thatis importance of a dynamic economy. and that is our pitch to the country. i something different, and his relu cta nt something different, and his reluctant conclusion that she is caught you think it's a powerful and going to vote for a different party persuasive one, and we are going to than the conservative party that he get on and get this thing done. has belonged to for 60 odd years. we
2:54 pm
anyway, thank you all very, very will that there are come back to the much for our time. i think this is politics in a moment. going to be a very exciting loss of two weeks of the election. we have got to keep going and making our here‘s your business central point so that we can take headlines on afternoon live. absolutely nothing for granted, but manchester city football club has we have some fantastic — fantastic— broken the global record for a sports team vaulation. it comes as the parent company candidate standing here and in the of premier league champions announced a £389 million south—west, and cornwall, and i hope investment from the us private very much you will make sure they equity firm silver lake. are all returned to westminster on december the 12th. thank you all holding company city football group very much stop of borisjohnson is worth £3.73 billion pounds. there, and people go outside and the indian ride—sharing firm 0la has begun signing up drivers speak to our correspondent ben wright. what to do? he is and the at in london ahead of plans to launch services in the capital "in the coming weeks". it comes days after rival uber was denied this cider making farm. this is his a new licence to operate in london third visit of the day. he has been after repeated safety failures. an cornwall since this morning when he went to hospital in penzance and 0la was granted a licence from transport for london earlier this year. p°pped he went to hospital in penzance and popped into a satellite making company, and now he here talking to
2:55 pm
victoria beckham‘s eponymous fashion tory activist, people has a vote you business has posted another can probably bank on. he is not annual loss as demand for the former meeting very many members of the spice girl‘s high end clothes public during this campaign. there are certainly no big town centre walkabout or anything like that. it "plateaued". the label, which has not made a profit since it is also pretty controlled, small launched in 2008, reported a loss of £12.3 million scale, meeting local party for 2018. sales slipped 16% to £35 million, activists, certainly. it was interesting. the jokes i activists, certainly. it was interesting. thejokes i have heard several times in the last couple of days already, but it is a general amid weaker wholesale demand. election campaign. the questions on where other social care plans that we re where other social care plans that were promised, they are not really fleshed out in the manifesto there is a new report on whatsoever. mrjohnson said there are coming at some point. a very there is a new report on capitalism, there is a new report on capitalism, the relationship between business and society. tell us more about strong rebuttal to labour‘s attack that. yes, it has come out from the line it today i went to brexit british academy. it is a body we future us— uk trade deals on the have in this country for humanities and social sciences, and it has nhs. mrjohnson think that the price published its principles for paid for drugs would be part of any purposeful business, outlining the changes that they believe businesses discussions, they wouldn't be on the from the uk really order to put table. he is trying to shut down society and the planet at the centre very firmly that labour are tackling today. but there are enough was huge of their beings. i cannot talk to on answer questions about the nature someone of their beings. i cannot talk to someone who was involved in helping
2:56 pm
of the future trade agreement if to formulate these principles. i brexit happened between the uk and the us, at the uk and the eu. we have got sharon darcy on the line, the director of the charity. really just don't know what's going to good to talk to you. talk me through happen, but mrjohnson a thing, just trust me to do it. as another nhs the principles are listed in this question, very much a preoccupation report. the principles are designed to tackle some of the deep problems to do back from the journalists and i'd be facing our society. so, stop bring about whether felt bad about ona i'd be facing our society. so, stop on a social inequality and the the queues in hospitals in cornwall climate crisis. it is a set of eight ten yea rs the queues in hospitals in cornwall ten years after the tories came to quite so clear—cut simple principles power. yeah, and in-house response that can be applied to all he said, i am businesses, whatever the size, and power. yeah, and in-house response he said, iam a power. yeah, and in-house response he said, i am a new prime minister, this will be a new government. i across all different geographies. so, different countries, to try and think that it's out he is trying to really put the public purpose of deal with questions that refer back to the tory party's record in business are front and centre in terms of the activity that government over the last decade. businesses carry out to tackle they have been in power since 2010, and often that does pose problems social and environmental issues, and for borisjohnson, really put people and the planet and often that does pose problems for boris johnson, but and often that does pose problems for borisjohnson, but he is trying to press the reset button and say i first, rather than profitability. wasn't prime minister, i am now, and professor colin, the author, is this will be a new government with a quoted as saying that the uk has a new magic. but he is having to account for the tony's no long record in government. we will have
2:57 pm
particular extreme form of to leave it there, but thank you so capitalism. how far away our british much for that. this cider industry businesses currently from operating diner, and there is a full list of candidates cornwall, as of course in within these principles are putting society and the planet at the heart every constituency on the bbc of what they are doing?” website. right now, we are going to society and the planet at the heart of what they are doing? i think businesses are different, but even ta ke website. right now, we are going to take a look at the weather. and really good, cutting edge businesses, it is quite unusual to find a business were they really have embedded the purpose of their we have still got some cloud and activity and the heart of everything rain to get through. that was earlier in york. some hefty that they do. so, some businesses do really well in certain areas of downpours earlier on through bills activity, but really embedding and southern england. rain across northern scotland, and in this area change, so that purpose is front and persistent rain that has been centre, is what the set of setting in three parts of north—east principles announced today by the england. that was put into british academy is all about, and to south—east scotland is. these areas get that, we need to change could see some localised flooding corporate law, so we need to put and travel disruption as this purpose at the heart of corporate persistent rain continues on deep law. we need to think about into the evening and the night. the governance and how governance helps rain continued for a time across aligned management team interest northern scotland. that starts to with the purpose of the sink southward. dry better for organisation. and for regulated northern ireland, the southern half of wales on the south of england. businesses, which we and sustainability first focus on, we
2:58 pm
some clear spells, one or two need to think about the higher showers, and temperatures holding up hurdle that they need to face in terms of engaging with their between five and 93. tomorrow, and there is still some cloud and rain workforce , terms of engaging with their workforce, their customers and other and the forecast across southern stakeholders to deliver on that scotla nd and the forecast across southern scotland and northern england. some purpose and ensure that those are in northern ireland, that cloudy businesses are a force for good in weather getting into the midlands, society rather than having negative parts of east anglia and wales later impacts. so, all of this is going to in the day. brighter down towards have to be put to about the new the south—west, and then for the far north of england, the skies will be government comprises of december that well. many thanks. that was brightening. we will see sunny spells. 0ne brightening. we will see sunny spells. one or two showers and a quite an impressive to—do list! strong northerly wind which is going thank you. to start to introduce a colder feel now it‘s time for a look at the weather. to start to introduce a colder feel to the weather. and that process continues as we move out of thursday we have brought rain and forecast until friday. just about all of us get into those cold air, plunging tonight and for some of us tomorrow. down from the arctic. it means a for this afternoon, the most cold start on friday. quite a persistent of the rain work into widespread frost out there, and the eastern areas england. what are way on the far south and south—west. ta nks eastern areas england. what are tanks for the north—west of some cloud and rain for a time on scotland. 90 don‘t put rebels in parts of england. the best chance of friday. elsewhere, more sunshine than we have had. still one or two she was peppering north and eastern staying northern ireland, coast, and some of them could be one temperatures ten to 30 degrees.
2:59 pm
today, because temperatures much 0vernight, the will continue to pour slower than had been for most down across lincolnshire, yorkshire places. between four and 7 degrees. and into northumberland. the risk of enter the weekend, dry and chilly localised flooding, but little did not come up we will also see weather to come, but low pressure potential for a few problems sores a fly on the ointment, because building and across the south—east of scotland. localised flooding it is going to dry and introduce a weather front. there is it is going to dry and introduce a impossibility. 0vernight, a few weatherfront. there is uncertainty about tariff for north america. be passing showers, but these are the sight of those could see some great and possibly snow over —. unlikely to cause significant problems. on thursday, marina thanks further north, plenty of sunshine, to this area of low pressure. one or two showers, on another very eventually, it will turn a drier, chilly day. that rain and the south sunnier and colder from the we re chilly day. that rain and the south were clear by sandy. sunshine and a 00:59:34,381 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 few showers, either and to weekend. eventually, it will turn a drier, sunnier and colderfrom the north. that is the weather.
3:00 pm
hello, you‘re watching afternoon live, i‘m carrie gracie. today at 4: the snp launches its election manifesto, warning that the uk may still leave the european union without a deal with brexit—related chaos to come. the labour leader highlights documents which he claims show the government has discussed offering the united states access to the nhs after brexit. these documents confirm the us is demanding the nhs is on the table in the trade talks. these uncensored documents leave borisjohnson‘s denials in absolute tatters. it's total nonsense. and this is brought up time and again by the labour party as a distraction from the problems that they're having. the snp launches its election manifesto, warning that the uk may still leave the european union without a deal with brexit—related chaos to come. who should decide scotland‘s future? the people who live here or boris johnson? a vote for the snp on december 12th
3:01 pm
is a vote to escape brexit. a cinema chain has banned a new film about gangs after a brawl, but the director tells us his movie had nothing to do with the violence. is it prejudiced? do they believe this film brings a certain type? is it a colour thing? you start thinking all these things, you know, and then, i don‘t know, it was an upsetting time. coming up on afternoon live: all the sport with katie. we‘ll bring you the moving story of max taylor who, at 19 years old, could step out for manchester united against astana tomorrow in the europa league after recovering from testicular cancer. thanks, katie. and ben rich has all the weather. some more very wet weather for some of us during this evening and
3:02 pm
tonight but as we head towards the weekend it will turn drier, brighter but colder. full details on the way. also coming up: gary rhodes, the celebrity chef who championed british food, has died at the age of 59. hello, everyone, this is afternoon live. jeremy corbyn says he has evidence that the nhs is at risk from a post—brexit trade deal with the united states. at a news conference this morning, the labour leader produced documents which he said showed talks had taken place about drugs pricing and access to nhs contracts. borisjohnson dismissed the claims as "total nonsense" and said
3:03 pm
he could give an "absolute cast iron guarantee" the nhs would not be on the table in trade talks. 0ur political correspondent jessica parker reports. 451 pages of unredacted documents and information. all of it here. brandishing these, it was intended to be a dramatic moment. he claims these documents, detailing meetings between us and uk officials, prove the nhs is at risk from a conservative led brexit. more expensive drug prices, he says, runaway privatisation. now we know, direct from the secret reports, that they never wanted you to see. the us is demanding that our nhs is on the table in negotiations for a toxic deal. it is no secret that american companies want access to the uk drugs market but, in these piles and piles of documents, do you have evidence
3:04 pm
that uk ministers agreed that the health service should be part of trade talks? if you want to know whether ministers were involved in these talks or not, then they sanctioned the talks, they are obviously fully aware of the talks, and they are the ones that were declining to make the documents published. if, say, borisjohnson is the next prime minister and he wants to secure a trade deal with the us, he is going to have to concede ground on a number of issues. i'm certain that the nhs will be one of them. so there is a big wad of paper to wade through and interpret and labour will make its claims in terms of what these meetings, which we have heard of before, really amount to. but those claims will be heavily contested. borisjohnson, visiting a hospital today, wasn‘t prime minister when these meetings took place and said... there will be no sale of the nhs, no privatisation. the nhs is not on the
3:05 pm
table in any way. the nhs is in no way on the table, in no aspect whatever. and this, as i say, is continually brought up by the labour party as a diversionary tactic from the difficulties they are encountering. today‘s effort and a big moment for labour came after a series of difficult ones forjeremy corbyn yesterday. mr corbyn, are you fit for high office? heavily criticised over his handling of anti—semitism allegations, he was asked again if he wanted to apologise to the jewish community. i made it very clear — anti—semitism is completely wrong in our society. 0ur party did make it clear when i was elected leader and after that that anti—semitism is unacceptable in any form in our party or our society and, indeed, offered its sympathies and apologies to those that had suffered. while his shadow chancellor said this... we have said that and i will repeat
3:06 pm
it again, i am really sorry the way we handled the issue because we learned the lessons from that and we have also invited people to say, if there are still more lessons to be learned, come and see us and help us. talking about the nhs today, that is more comfortable territory forjeremy corbyn. politicians may find a path onto other topics but it isn‘t always easy. 0ur political correspondent ben wright has been travelling with the prime minster and joins us now from redruth. did he seem at all rattled by these 451 unredacted pages? know, and he was asked about it during a visit to a cider making factory a few minutes ago, which is a clotted cream manufacturer. he was emphatic when he was asked about labour‘s dossier that the nhs was not on the table, insisting that either the price paid
3:07 pm
for drugs or services provided by the nhs would in any way be part of trade discussions when they happen between the us and uk after brexit. so very keen to host this down. mr johnson was also asked about allegations of islamophobia within the tory party which have surfaced again in recent months. he confirmed that there would be an inquiry into the broader issue into islamophobia and anti—semitism and discrimination and anti—semitism and discrimination and that would stop before christmas, not a specific inquiry to allegations of islamophobia. but in the last few minutes, a tory candidate has been suspended in glasgow central, and the party said it was withdrawing its support over the alleged use of anti—muslim language there. so that remains a question that borisjohnson has been asked as well. and what then about
3:08 pm
the mood between borisjohnson, as you have been following him around today in redruth and penzance and truro, how the exchanges with voters at the moment? they are few and far between. they are hardly happening. he is speaking on the whole to employees at small businesses like this and is addressing party activists who are hugely supportive and like boris johnson‘s activists who are hugely supportive and like borisjohnson‘s performance when he turns up and tries to rally the troops. he is not plunging into the troops. he is not plunging into the crowd in towns and villages and cities around the country or having random encounters with members of the public at all. it is hard to judge how he is going down among the non—tory voting electorate. he is here in cornwall which is safe territory. this party is traditionally a lib dems tory battle
3:09 pm
ground. at the moment all the seats in cornwall are conservative held so this looks like a defensive mood by mrjohnson to shore up conservative support down here in a leave supporting part of the country so his brexit messages probably resonating rather well.|j his brexit messages probably resonating rather well. i need to bring you some more sad news. we seem bring you some more sad news. we seem to have had several deaths today. news just coming seem to have had several deaths today. newsjust coming in seem to have had several deaths today. news just coming in of the death of the broadcaster clive james the age of 80, clive james the television critic, broadcaster, writer. he has been ill or was ill for most of the past decade and talked very openly about his problems with leukaemia. he had been a heavy drinker and smoker for much of his life, but the news from his agents today that at the age of 80
3:10 pm
clive james has passed away. we will have more thoughts on that later in the hour. the scottish national party has launched its manifesto for next month‘s general election, saying it is time for scotland to be treated fairly. the party leader, nicola sturgeon, said the country will pay a price for what she called the conservatives‘ obsession with brexit. she said another independence referendum next year would be the main demand for supporting a possible minority labour government alongside calls for increased spending on the nhs. 0ur scotland correspondent james shaw reports. for many, this is the brexit election. for nicola sturgeon and the snp, it is also the independence election. because her price for supporting a minority labour government would be the right to hold a second independence referendum. but first, there was a warning about what she thinks a conservative government would actually mean.
3:11 pm
unless borisjohnson is stopped, this willjust be the start. brexit is nowhere near being done. the tories have barely got going. they haven‘t even started trade talks yet and, because of johnson‘s ha rdline position, there is every chance, every chance, that the uk will leave the eu without a trade deal next year. that would be a catastrophe forjobs. and even if he somehow avoids that, his dream deal will be a nightmare for scotland. and nicola sturgeon had a big promise on the nhs — another part of that price for supporting labour. if the next uk government raised health spending per head to the current scottish level, it would not only substantially increase health investment in england, it would mean, by 2024—25, frontline investment in nhs scotland would be £4 billion
3:12 pm
higher than it is today. other priorities include £1.5 billion to end austerity, decisive moves to halt climate change, opposition to increasing the pension age and scrapping trident nuclear submarines based in scotland. but what about another independence referendum? people are becoming increasingly sick of hearing jeremy corbyn and borisjohnson talking about not allowing the scottish people to choose their own future. well, i‘ve got news for them. it is not up to you. applause. and you know what? it is not up to me either. it is a decision for the people of scotland. in scotland, it is hard to separate this election from the independence question.
3:13 pm
if borisjohnson wins and brexit happens, does that mean scottish voters will be more likely to want to break away from the united kingdom? the answer to that question affects the future of scotland and the rest of the uk. the leader of plaid cymru, adam price, has insisted his demand for a future referendum about welsh independence is realistic. the party, which is defending four seats at the election, wants a referendum by 2030. mr price said support for a breakaway is growing. if you look at young people, 54% now support independence. it‘s theirfuture, you know, that we are talking about and i think there is a realisation, look at the chaos of westminster in the last three and a half years. many, many people are coming to the conclusion there has to be a better way, a welsh way of solving our problems.
3:14 pm
the archbishop of canterbury, justin welby, says he believes the decision by britain‘s chief rabbi to speak out about anti—semitism in the labour party was "one of the most painful decisions he ever had to take." the archbishop was speaking to emma barnett on bbc radio 5 live this morning. when you look at his article he talks about it being one of the most painful decisions he has ever had to take. and i know that is true. his instincts like mine and others are that during an election you keep still, you say nothing. and hejust was... a lot of people in thejewish community was saying, you have got to speak, and he felt there was no choice. a reminder of the news we broke in the last couple of minutes, that the writer and broadcaster,
3:15 pm
poet, tv critic clive james has died at the age of 80. a statement has been published from united agents, talking about him dying in his home in cambridge on sunday, and a private funeral attended by family and close friends took place at pembroke college cambridge earlier today. it went on, clive died ten yea rs today. it went on, clive died ten years after his first terminal diagnosis and one month after he laid down his pen for the final time. he enjoyed his ever multi—playing illnesses with patience and good humour, knowing until the last moment he had experienced more than his fair share of this great, good world. he was grateful to the staff at addenbrooke‘s hospitalfor their ca re addenbrooke‘s hospitalfor their care and kindness which unexpectedly allowed him so much extra time. his family would like to thank the
3:16 pm
nurses of the hospice home team for their help in his last days which allowed him to die peacefully and at home surrounded by his family and his books. let‘s get a report on the life and career of clive james now. welcome once again to the bbc‘s first deregulated fully sponsor tv programme. for your protection the entire show has been pre—bought for one minute. he was the tv critic who became a tv star who talked about tv. if you have yet to see a welsh soap opera you must catch the bbc‘s show. it is nonstop. clive james was also a comic performer, journalist, essayist, poet, lyricist. also a comic performer, journalist,
3:17 pm
essayist, poet, lyricistlj also a comic performer, journalist, essayist, poet, lyricist. iwould classify me as a writer because everything i do is based on writing. even when i am improvising i am writing in my head. and that‘s what i do. histv writing in my head. and that‘s what i do. his tv showsjumped between prime—time entertainment and highbrow brain food. he especially admired socrates with whom he had a lot in common. born in sydney, his childhood became a bestselling memoir. when sydney was all there was to see, i could not see it, but now i can. was to see, i could not see it, but nowl can. he arrived in britain in the 60s and during his student days joined the cambridge footlights. are you seated comfortably? ok. in the 80s, he loved japanese shows. the joint code... formats the british television would go on to copy them.
3:18 pm
in ourtime, fame television would go on to copy them. in our time, fame is everywhere. you cannot get away from it. by the end of the 90s his tv career was coming to an end but the words kept flowing. he rekindled his songwriting partnership with peter at cannes. and then he was diagnosed with leukaemia. in 2010 and again a year later, he thought he was about to die. he was saved by a new drug. there was some borrowed time. and a spurt of action. it has been very productive. i wrote myself off in 2011 because i was on my way out then. i was in serious medical travel, and i got saved. so this spare time. it is very important to me because i was not expecting to haveit me because i was not expecting to have it and isjust me because i was not expecting to have it and is just good me because i was not expecting to have it and isjust good manners me because i was not expecting to have it and is just good manners to use it well. he could write about
3:19 pm
anything from commentaries on cruised to an appreciation of eddie waring to this, his words and facing the end, his hopes he would live long enough to see the leaves emerge ona long enough to see the leaves emerge on a newly planted maple tree. filling the double doors to bait my eyes, a final flood filling the double doors to bait my eyes, a finalflood of filling the double doors to bait my eyes, a final flood of colours will live on as my mind dies, burned by my vision of a world that sean so brightly at the last and then was gone. —— shone. the director of blue story, the new film about london gangs which has been banned by some cinemas after a mass brawl in birmingham, has said the violence in cinemas had nothing to do with the film. the vue chain has stopped showing blue story because it says
3:20 pm
there have been incidents in 16 of their theatres. rapman, who also wrote the film, has questioned whether there are hidden reasons for the ban. vue insists its decision had nothing to do with race. 0ur arts editor, will gompertz, has been speaking to the film—maker. fictional trouble on the streets of london. real trouble on the streets of birmingham. the urban drama blue story has become a news story after vue cinemas decided to pull it from all its screens for what they claimed was security reasons. a decision which has astonished the director. i was thinking, what is the reason? does the owner have an issue with the urban youth? is he prejudiced? is it a colour thing? you start going through all these things. it was an upsetting time.
3:21 pm
the film is based on gangs and they have been in cinema watching it together. "that reminds us of that." and leaving connected. did you ever think that it could be a lightning rod for trouble? i knew it would attract a lot of young people and that was the aim. it was the aim to have the cinema filled up with 15—year—olds making the choice whether to go down that route or that route. did i think people would be pulling out machetes? of course not. and no one did because of blue story anyway. how does it affect you, as a film—maker, that this film has been pulled? i feel cheated. it‘s always an upwards hurdle,
3:22 pm
coming from my background. the last thing i thought was a cinema would ban us from every single site. what do you think this sort of decision says to the next rapman, trying to make the same journey you have made? it is just telling them, it will be a hard journey, and, when you get there, it will not get any easier. but we crack on. they take our legs, we crawl. the chief executive of vue international said... blue story is still being screened by other cinema chains.
3:23 pm
the celebrity chef gary rhodes has died at the age of 59. he presented bbc series including masterchef and rhodes around britain and his restaurants were awarded a record five michelin stars. tributes have been paid by many of the country‘s best known chefs including gordon ramsay and marcus wareing. and we can speak now to broadcaster and former masterchef host loyd grossman. you have known gary for nearly 30 yea rs, you have known gary for nearly 30 years, your memories?” you have known gary for nearly 30 years, your memories? i first met gary in 1990 when he was returning to london following a very successful stint cooking at the castle hotel in taunton, and he came toa castle hotel in taunton, and he came to a restaurant in mayfair called greenhouse. he was very exciting news, he was youthful and edgy, he was very news, he was youthful and edgy, he was very different from the cliched idea of a chef and what was most important about gary is the way that
3:24 pm
he re—educated the public in terms of how they thought about british cooking. 0na of how they thought about british cooking. on a day when we have had a couple of major cultural figures die like clive james and jonathan miller, it is interesting to think about the cultural influence of a chef like gary and what he did for our british way of life and the way we think about our british culture and heritage. expand on that, what do you think he did, that was different? at a time when most chefs we re different? at a time when most chefs were obsessed with french classical cooking and variations there of, gary really helped us to rediscover the traditional aspects of british food. and he also gave us an interest in british produce. he said this country produces great raw materials, let‘s celebrate them and
3:25 pm
rediscover them, and all the stuff we are rediscover them, and all the stuff we a re interested rediscover them, and all the stuff we are interested in now about local sourcing and heritage, vegetables and all that stuff, was something that was given a huge push by gary and he was one of the first people to present that to a new younger audience, and because of his persona , audience, and because of his persona, he was able to do it in a very populous way. he was an extraordinarily nice and generous and empathetic person, and i think you will be much missed. the persona which so many people mention is also the training as a chef because he brought a great seriousness in terms of the food. he was extraordinarily serious, he had great bouts of concentration, amazing technique, seriously talented chef, but he did it with a light touch. he never talked down to people all patronised
3:26 pm
the audience. he was extraordinarily kind and generous to young upcoming chefs and that is a very important pa rt chefs and that is a very important part of his legacy. at a time we expect chefs to be devious and huge egos, gary was a modest self facing kind and gentle purse, and he did a tremendous amount to improve british food scene and people‘s attitudes to food scene and people‘s attitudes to food and giving them morejoy in eating and cooking and what a great legacy to leave behind. leave us with a parting thought on one dish we should all cook in memory of gary rhodes. gary did a great bread and butter pudding. thank you. we will go away, look it up and cook it! take care, lloyd. let‘s return now to our main story. labour is claiming it has government documents showing that the nhs is on the table in talks with the us
3:27 pm
about a trade deal after brexit. the prime minister has dismissed his claim as "total nonsense". with me is mark dayan, policy analyst and head of public affairs at the nuffield trust, a charity that seeks to improve health care through independent evidence and analysis. it isa it is a joy to have someone neutral in this battlefield. in terms of this dossier, all these pages among redacted documents, what do you make of them? i have tried to be the main bits. the first thing to say is the nhs is not being sold in any way and the whole thing is being flogged and the whole thing is being flogged and the americans will own the hospitals, that will not happen, but what you do see in there which is exactly what we expected is the americans asking for various ways in which they might be able to get the nhs to pay more money to their pharmaceutical companies for the drugs they sell us and from an nhs point of view that is a concern
3:28 pm
because if you are paying more money for exactly the same drugs you are losing out in that situation. jeremy corbyn says the nhs is on the table and boris johnson says, corbyn says the nhs is on the table and borisjohnson says, no way, the nhs is not on the table, can they both be right? i don't really think there is a right answer because the nhs has pharmaceutical products but that‘s not what people have in mind. to give you an idea of the sort of thing that americans are asking for, a couple of them are about the amount of time that companies can keep possession of the drug so only they can make it and charge what price they like nobody else can make similar wants to compete with them. they are trying to get those to be longer which would mean the nhs would have to pay a higher price for a year or two years or more. is there anything else in the that lea pt there anything else in the that leapt out at you is something important? another thing that people are concerned about is that although it is difficult to see how a trade
3:29 pm
deal with america could increase the level of outsourcing to private companies, they already have a lot of rights to bid for outsourced contracts in the english nhs at least, it might make it difficult to renationalise the nhs. if they wa nted renationalise the nhs. if they wanted to do it without paying companies compensation because it might enable this company is to say, you have shut us out not paid at any compensation, we are suing you. you see issues like that rising as well. the big question will be whether or not in the finished trade deal the nhs was exempt from things like that, but that will probably be a live issue as we move through this process as well. and we had lord heseltine talking about the difficulty of the uk given the scale difference negotiating and expecting any kind of favourable terms from a trump administration on this. do you get a sense of a hard—nosed approach
3:30 pm
to these documents? america is the biggest partner in all its trade negotiations, being the biggest economy in the world. and in some senses, the uk is a supporter and ally, but the us has done lots of trade negotiations before usually with smaller countries like south korea that are very dependent on it asa korea that are very dependent on it as a military ally, and those countries have pushed back, so we need to see uk negotiators if this goes ahead pushing hard for the interests of the uk in the nhs. now it‘s time for a look at the weather, with ben rich. the weather promises something brighter but colder as we head towards a weekend, however in the shorter term, we have got some to contend with. having a procession through south—east scotland and north—east england, which could give flooding and travel disruption this
3:31 pm
evening out tonight. some are and continuing through northern parts of scotland, northern ireland and southern reels becoming predominantly dry. monetary showers, but clear spells as well. temperatures between five and 9 degrees. still some printer content for tomorrow morning across southern scotland, northern england, some in northern england, wales and east anglia. brighter with a few showers to the south—west. a brisk northerly wind, it is going to start to feel cold. single digit temperatures across the northern half of the uk, and all of us get into that cold are provided. a frosty star, low temperatures through the day, but we get to see some brightness.
3:32 pm
this is bbc news. our latest headlines. jeremy corbyn produces documents which he claims show the government has discussed offering the united states access to the nhs after brexit. the snp launches its election manifesto — warning that the uk may still leave europe without a deal — and that there‘s brexit—related chaos to come. austrialian writer and broadcaster clive james has died at the age of 80. a cinema chain has banned a new film about gangs after a brawl, but the director tells us his movie had nothing to do with the violence.
3:33 pm
gary rhodes, the celebrity chef who championed british food, has died at the age of 59. sport now on afternoon live, with katie. first, the remarkable story of the manchester united player who‘s back playing after recovering from testicular cancer. this is really inspiring story. so, max taylor is 19 and could get his first team manchester united debut tomorrow against astana in the europa league. but, last year, his world was turned upside down as he was diagnosed with testicular cancer five months after signing his first professional contract. since that moment, he‘s been doing all he can to make sure he can get back to doing what he loves, playing football. and he‘s the one name that stands out on the squad list, also showing manager 0le gunnar solskjaer‘s commitment once again to the club‘s younger players. i think a massive thing that i want
3:34 pm
people to take from me going through the cancer is that the fact that i beat cancer, i don‘t want that to be what people remember me for. that is a part of me, but that will not define what i do. what do you want people to remember you for? hopefully as a great person, great footballer and someone who gives back. united play astana in the europa league tomorrow. tonight, liverpool and chelsea are in champions league action. both teams willjoin tottenham and manchester city in the last 16 if they win. turning to tracker, jolted out of form, but it looks as if he has got the support of his team—mates. yes, it‘s one of crickets oldest questions. does captaincy affect a players form? well, root made just 2 and 11 in england‘s first test
3:35 pm
against new zealand at the bay 0val. and he‘s dropped out of the top 10 of the test batting rankings for the first time since august 20—14. root‘s average in 2019 is just over 27 from 10 tests, compared with just over 47 from his career as a whole. he also saw his side thrashed by an innings and 65 runs. well, all—rounder ben stokes has given his full support to root after the england captain‘s disappointing performance in that first test. he has the backing of everyone in the changing room. that is the most important thing to him as a captain and to us as players in general. the only thing that matters is the changing room vibe. everything else outside of that is just noise. he is england captain. he is the best player in england.
3:36 pm
he knows that he has the full support of us in the changing room. israel folau is demanding more compensation from rugby australia. the former wallabies star is suing, after being fired back in may for making anti—gay remarks on social media. folau, who‘s a christian, argues that the termination of his contract is a case of religious discrimination. he wants £7.4 million, arguing that australia would have achieved a "superior performance" at the rugby world cup in september if he had been in the side. now, the wbo super—middleweight champion callum smith says it would "make sense" to fight wbc champion, billyjoe saunders next. smith narrowly retained his title, seeing offjohn ryder on saturday. both he and saunders want to fight sorl canelo alvarez next. but smith believes an all british match—up would be a great alternative. he is a world champion, i am a world champion. we are both british and undefeated. it is a fight that has generated a lot of interest in the public.
3:37 pm
i think a fight with each other makes sense. i will sit down with my team and see what fight we can deliver. either way, it should be a good fight. you tend to hear about sportsmen and women taking ice baths — well, we‘re going to show you something that takes things to the next level. this is professional skier tyler wallasch, who decides to take to the ice in a different way than usual. in he goes, and there‘s bit of swim involved. he‘s got to find his way out with no goggles... but up he pops... check the hair... and showing us all how ice baths are done properly. that‘s all the sport for now.
3:38 pm
now on afternoon live, let‘s go nationwide and see what‘s happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. nina warhurst is in salford, and she‘ll be talking to us about the local reaction to the visit from john mcdonnel and sajid javid today in the north west. back with you in just a moment, nina. and harry gration is in leeds where a charity has said food banks in the yorkshire and humber area are braced for the busiest december yet. with you shortly, harry. but first, nina, the chancellor and shadow chancellor both visited your region today — what have they had to say? they have focused on lancashire today, because there are five marginal seats were a tiny screen protector tip them into labour, and john mcdonald was an candle, where there are fewer than 1300 votes in it. he was reiterating its promises for the north, talking about a bank of the north, decisions on what we we re of the north, decisions on what we were spending would be a bank of the north, decisions on what we were spending would be paid locally, for that they would invest in also talked about part of the treasury to the north—west. as has been talked about before, but he said that would mean hundreds and hundreds he
3:39 pm
reiterated labour‘s commitment to northern powerhouse, hs three, which would run from hull all the way over to liverpool, which would cost 39 by japan. isaid, to liverpool, which would cost 39 by japan. i said, all of that sounds great, but how do you plan to pay for it? his answer was, we do not apologise from looking at it decades of borrowing under labour, because we need to change the status quo. the one jobs economy they have created is one of low pay and insecure work. we have got to start investing. we are borrowing because interest rates are low, the imf and world bank are all known as a time to border. what would you say to families and the north—west who say that sounds nice, to have a society but things are pure, but it is going to cause too much. it will not fall on their shoulders. so, a promise from the shadow chancellor that middle earning families wouldn‘t have to pay for that sort of
3:40 pm
investment, and a second seat on the target in packager has a 1400 votes in it, and the chancellor sajid javid put their reiterating the conservative‘s believe there should be an investment and the north of england eden project, very much like the one any coral. it would cost around £85 million, but she believes that the conservatives need to sustain a strong economy, and then the rest will follow. i asked him, a performance boost like that in lancashire, where there will be dancing, choirs, but will that mean toafamily dancing, choirs, but will that mean to a family on universal credit you are using food banks every day? the people of morecambe need a strong economy. after what labour left behind last time they were in office, with the deepest recession in almost 100 years, we have now got a strong in almost 100 years, we have now got a strong economy, in almost 100 years, we have now got a strong economy, and we have got to keep it that bit. that is keeping a tight grip on the public finances
3:41 pm
and backing businesses. politicians low percent of the authorities, but what about the public? what have they had to see it return? it were truly interesting to to do my talking to students at the college forjohn mcdonnell was visiting. a few of them were really worried about brexit, what the outcome of a deal or no deal could be for the future. it wasn‘t just about that. a few of the mentioned leisure facilities outscored in the area, relatives of those who are zero—hours contracts, so they have no leisure time at all. one of them said, if you could, he would vote conservative because she is concerned about jeremy corbyn‘s promises around the armed forces. so every mixed bag of views across lancashire today, and that is what we are finding across the region. certainly, like 2017, it will not just be a brexit election. now over to leeds, and harry gration. a new report has come out today which suggests food banks in your area will be in high demand this december?
3:42 pm
tell us more. we love any fantastic place. i enough to live in yorkshire as well, and yet these figures are very disturbing. the other and desperate, iam going disturbing. the other and desperate, i am going to show about you. 186,003 date for parcels have been given out this year. that is up 44%. half of those were two children. and to add to those disturbing figures, the average weekly income of households who get decent food parcels have a £50 only to spend after the event. and one in five, no money at all. and 94% of people who use a fit banks are destitute. this really is something that we should all be concerned about. it is very concerning, as you say. i did nothing about that report, the numbers of people using them for the first time are going up. are indeed. again, it is going to be a time for christmas. we have an interesting
3:43 pm
perspective, because before it somebody who used to use food banks, and to know is volunteering. she has called irene, nice listen to what she has to say. i came to the food bank with a virtual because i was struggling, and i had kids at home, so struggling, and i had kids at home, so i've got it virtually gave me a free person. was it difficult to come here the first? it was difficult, because you feel a little bit ashamed that you can't afford to feed your kids. that should not be allowed in 2019, 2020. this christmas could be very challenging. all i can say to you that there is, you i suspect throughout the uk, there are lots of people who want to help and who will help us. heidi, thank you so much. ijust a reminder to viewers that if you‘ll report is ona to viewers that if you‘ll report is on a successor 2pm tonight. nina, also, thank you to you too. and lots more of your round—up of the regional politics tonight. thank you both for being with us.
3:44 pm
and if you would like to see more on any of those stories, you can find them on bbc iplayer. the reminder begot nationwide every afternoon at 4:30pm here on afternoon light. the liberal democrats have been on the campaign trail again today. in a somwhat unexpected twist, the former conservative minister lord heseltine spoke at their event, outlining why he believes the government‘s brexit strategy would be bad news for britain. he said he was still a pretty conservative, but his allegiance have been stretched to the limit. there are men and women in his commitment to their country, their country, their sense of what matters it to britain, with the future of
3:45 pm
britain at last, where the future of the younger generation lies, means that they have torn up their traditional loyalties, and there are people who will vote, and there are people who will vote, and there are people who will vote, and there are people who are standing for election had put behind them the traditional loyalties to the party because they perceive a greater loyalty to their country. 0ur political correspondent chris mason is in central london. quite something to see lord heseltine behind the liberal democrat slogan. quite. that image of him at the lectern with the lab democrat insignia on the front was really quite something, despite his views on the european union, he has been a pro—european as entire political life. he did make a summer argument about voting liberal democrat back at the european parliament elections in the summer, but nonetheless, there he was. what
3:46 pm
was quite striking is that he was appealing for people to vote liberal democrat to deny borisjohnson a majority, but he was at pains to remind viewers that he is still a conservative, he is still a member of the conservative party, and quite strikingly, he was very direct when he was asked specifically about the central policy at the heart of the lib dem page at this general election, that is an idea of evoking article 50, scrapping brexit, if they were to win an overall majority. he felt that idea was, in his words, naive, and insert the emphasis should be on a situation they could force another referendum on brexit in the next parliament. but quite striking for him to be so candid response to that. he was able to caveat it by saying, i am not a liberal democrat, but he was saying toa liberal democrat, but he was saying to a discussion that is going on within the party about the extent to which emphasising that was a mistake or not. there are those who think
3:47 pm
that it was perhaps overdone, and it was a tack too far, if you know, and alienate some people who don‘t like that idea. for others, there was a sense that they had to do that to be seeing something distinctive and different on brexit from the likes of labour, the snp and plaid cymru. 0ne of labour, the snp and plaid cymru. one other thought, the liberal democrats were not pitching the idea of evoking article 50 as shifting the emphasis. the owner emphasising, to borrow a line from chuck emma, that the other vote party, as he described them, rather than as idea of scrapping brexit altogether, given the huge they have had from some about how anti—democratic that is. and no suggestion that they are actually going to substantially change tack on that between now and the election any fortnight?” change tack on that between now and the election any fortnight? i think it isa the election any fortnight? i think it is a shift of emphasis. from speaking to sa batino, it is a shift of emphasis. from speaking to sabatino, who is one of
3:48 pm
the frontbenchers, from listing to the frontbenchers, from listing to the answers in the news conference this afternoon, jo swinson did an interview in scotland today as well, none of them are saying that they arejunking that none of them are saying that they are junking that thought, but i think that the art of running to be more publicly honest about where they are likely to end up after the general election, are you not sleeping into downing street as a majority government, and therefore talking more to an outcome that is perhaps more brightly than slipping into eternity, but there is a situation where there is a hung parliament and the could well hold the balance of power. intriguingly, just reflecting on what heseltine‘s contribution, i asked just reflecting on what heseltine‘s contribution, iasked him specifically, because the lib dems are fearful of this is a concern from foreign suspects and voters, i do not worry, as a conservative, despite what you think a bit brighter, that a vote for the liberal democrats makes it easier forjeremy corbyn to become prime minister. as art was that he didn‘t think the opinion polls were, and given mr,‘s recent performances
3:49 pm
under labour manifesto that there was any prospect ofjeremy corbyn getting that close to downing street, so therefore has a view to a vote for the liberal democrats was a safe, but also potentially helping brexit being stopped, but she would like to see. clearly it is a concern at the moment for the liberal democrats that the principal opponents and they conservatives can say to oh, but, if you vote let them, there is a chance of the other principal party getting in. thank you so much. in a moment, the latest business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. jeremy corbyn produces documents which he claims show the government has discussed offering the united states access to the nhs after brexit. the snp launches its election manifesto — warning that the uk may still leave europe without a deal — and that there‘s brexit—related chaos to come. austrialian writer and broadcaster clive james has died at the age of 80.
3:50 pm
here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. manchester city football club has broken the global record for a sports team vaulation. it comes as the parent company of premier league champions announced a £389 million investment from the us private equity firm silver lake. holding company city football group is worth £3.73 billion. the indian ride—sharing firm 0la has begun signing up drivers in london ahead of plans to launch services in the capital "in the coming weeks". it comes days after rival uber was denied a new licence to operate in london after repeated safety failures. 0la was granted a licence from transport for london earlier this year. victoria beckham‘s eponymous fashion business has posted another annual loss as demand for the former spice girl‘s high end clothes "plateaued".
3:51 pm
the label, which has not made a profit since it launched in 2008, reported a loss of £12.3 million for 2018. sales slipped 16% to £35 million amid weaker wholesale demand. now, with just 27 sleeps to go until christmas, you‘re looking at what we‘re buying? lakeland, the 50—year—old home shopping retailer, today announced the launch of its annual lakeland trends report, looking at the trends that shaped 2019 and those expected to be big this xmas. it looks like most of us will still be going traditional and opting for turkey, despite the rise of the flexitarian. monopoly — 80 years old — and other traditional card games are much more likely to make an appearance on christmas day over newer electronic games. looking back over 2019 — it was all about the sodastream, pizza 0vens, while spiralising and jam making fell out of favour.
3:52 pm
we were much more environmentally focused — buying products that help to reduce use of single—use plastic. and channelling our inner mrs hinch and marie kondo — nearly a quarter of people surveyed said, that rather than buying new, they were instead wanting to cleanse and declutter. and looking ahead, with the 2020 olympics hosted by tokyo, the retailer predicts japanese food will be a big trend. let‘s talk to gervais williams, managing director of premier miton group. good to talk to you. our top story was manchester city. it has broken that global record for a team valuation. the holding company now was nearly £4 billion. how much of the market leader does this make the
3:53 pm
premier league champions? how much further ahead at that than other football clu bs further ahead at that than other football clubs in terms of valuation? it is a big way. the previous record was manchester united, quoted in the us actually rose on the back of the steel up to a valuation of about $3.1 billion, u nless a valuation of about $3.1 billion, unless eliciting up its manchester city and some other football clubs in which this company has also invested up to about $4.8 billion. a really big step up. it shows valuable for pop—ups, the opportunity of selling the rights, and was particularly the opportunity of increasing extra content. they are of increasing extra content. they a re really of increasing extra content. they are really good at improving the content and increasing the visibility of some of these plans. just days after uber was denied a new operating licence after repeated safety failures, rival ending in shared writing firm 0la have started signing up drivers here in the capital ahead of its plant in uk launch. how do we know a lot of
3:54 pm
those are drivers who didn‘t pass safety checks, unsure about what it uber, what is to stop them signing up uber, what is to stop them signing up with 0la? uber, what is to stop them signing up with ola? it is interesting, because the driver population is quite mobile. we have had other companies and london for a partner, like port. has about 40,000 drivers, and 0la would try to scream some of these drivers i make the checks themselves. the most recent entry has been captain, which has about 6000 drivers. 0la will do their own checks, and it usually does the fact they have got a licence, which suggests they have satisfied the authorities that they are safe. and of course they have gone to great lengths to say that safety is our top concern. and also, uber, which became so ubiquitous on the street of the capital, it famously failed to turn a profit, so what makes 0la think it will manage to do that? to turn a profit, so what makes 0la think it will manage to do that7m is interesting. it is a profit, so
3:55 pm
what makes 0la think will manage to do that? it is interesting. it is very competitive. it takes a huge volume of drivers and traffic to generate returns. they have come as a little entrance, so perhaps they have got more development course, but they still have to generate huge volumes of drivers. that is the name of the game. the drivers can rip a run, and you really have to look after them well to succeed as a business in the sector. what has gone wrong for victoria beckham and posh company? she has got a good profile as a celebrity, as you know. nearly 30 million instagram followers, so she has a huge advantage. she has really struggled to sell her dresses. they are high end and it is a competitive market, and there are many alternatives. we have seen the market plateau, and she has lost market share, and that means that losses have increased to about 12 million in recent years. interesting, maybe the price point is just too high, interesting, maybe the price point isjust too high, because interesting, maybe the price point is just too high, because certainly there was no shortage of marketing behind it. really good to talk to you, as behind it. really good to talk to you , as ever. behind it. really good to talk to you, as ever. many thanks. i can‘t
3:56 pm
remember if it is just one of those businesses that it is really hard to make a profit, high—end fashion. yeah, ithink make a profit, high—end fashion. yeah, i think it is. lots of internal questions. shall we glance at the markets? let‘s, because it has been a regular day the ftse100 in london, and it had a really good session. it has hit its highest level since early august. a lot of investors are thinking that a lot of this to do with a purse that many are feeling with regards to rising expectations that china and the us might at last write some sort of entering a trade deal, which i know what you know all about. all of this helping european stocks to record highs today, so dax also doing well. sterling, a not too dark, that has also had a good day today. it has had enough in recent weeks, because it is an expedition amongst the business community that boris johnson might when a working majority, and of course that is what
3:57 pm
the business community is thought to favour, but of course things could change. thank you so much. some of us have had the chance to see brightness today, and there is one of over the next few days. just for the time being, we have still got some courage and rain to get through. that was how it looked earlier in york. a vestibular picture from earlier on. pours through wales and southern england, written across northern scotland. this persistently setting apart of england, that will spread to scotla nd england, that will spread to scotland as well. these areas could see some localised flooding and travel disruption as a persistent and continuous on deep into the evening and the night. the rain continues across northern scotland, that‘s not to sink southwards. lots of dry weather for northern ireland, southern belles and the south of england. some are clear spells, one
3:58 pm
or two showers, and temperatures holding up to five and 9 degrees. tomorrow, stop cloud and rain in the forecast for southern scotland and northern england. some rain for northern ireland. damp weather getting into the midlands, parts of east anglia and wales later in the day. right towards the south—west, still with showers. the skies will brighten in far north scotland. 0ne or two showers and a strong northerly wind, which is going to start to introduce a colder feel to the weather. and that process continues as we move out on thursday into the first part on friday. just about all of us get into their is a cold air, plunging down from the arctic. it means a cold start on friday morning. quite a widespread frost out there, away from the far south and the far west. here, we will stick with cloud and rain for friday. elsewhere, more sunshine than we have had. still one or two showers on northern and eastern coast, and those could be wintry,
3:59 pm
because much lower than they have been. for most places, between four and 7 degrees. 0n the weekend, dry and 7 degrees. 0n the weekend, dry and chilly weather to come. there‘s sort of fly and the ointment, because it will dry to introduce a weather front. there is because it will dry to introduce a weatherfront. there is uncertainty about how far or not it will get. we could see some rain and possibly snow over —. a brisk breeze as well, but further north, plenty of sunshine, one or two showers on another very chilly day. the rain and the south were sunshine and a few showers, and actually earned two began.
4:00 pm
this is bbc news, i‘m christian fraser. the headlines at 5.00: the labour leader produces documents which he claims shows the government has discussed offering the united states access to the nhs after brexit. these documents confirm the us is demanding the nhs is on the table in the trade talks. these uncensored documents leave borisjohnson‘s denials in absolute tatters. it's total nonsense. and this is brought up time and again by the labour party as a distraction from the problems that they're having. we‘ll be live in cornwall where the labour and conservative leaders are on the campaign trail, the other headlines this evening. the snp launches its election manifesto —
4:01 pm
4:02 pm
4:03 pm
4:04 pm
4:05 pm
4:06 pm
4:07 pm
4:08 pm
4:09 pm
4:10 pm
4:11 pm
4:12 pm
4:13 pm
4:14 pm
4:15 pm
4:16 pm
4:17 pm
4:18 pm
4:19 pm
4:20 pm
4:21 pm
4:22 pm
4:23 pm
4:24 pm
4:25 pm
4:26 pm
4:27 pm
4:28 pm
4:29 pm
4:30 pm
4:31 pm
4:32 pm
4:33 pm
4:34 pm
4:35 pm
4:36 pm
4:37 pm
4:38 pm
4:39 pm
4:40 pm
4:41 pm
4:42 pm
4:43 pm
4:44 pm
4:45 pm
4:46 pm
4:47 pm
4:48 pm
4:49 pm
4:50 pm
4:51 pm
4:52 pm
4:53 pm
4:54 pm
4:55 pm
4:56 pm
4:57 pm
4:58 pm
4:59 pm
5:00 pm

16 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on